Julien Kacou

After spending years teaching for both Teach for America and the Los Angeles Unified School District, Julien Kacou ’17 learned an important lesson: a law degree is a useful tool to protect the rights of the most at-risk students.

A veteran of the classroom, Kacou understands firsthand just how difficult it is for teachers to bring about change within Los Angeles’ education system—especially when it comes to reforming special needs education. That’s why Kacou hopes to use his Loyola Law School degree to effect change on the policy level, ensuring that special needs children receive the education they deserve.

A native of West Covina, Calif., Kacou mentored school children in South Los Angeles as an undergraduate student. That experience fueled Kacou’s passion for teaching. After graduation, he joined Teach For America, a nonprofit teaching corps. He encountered challenges instructing middle-school children with special needs. “It was definitely hard, but you finally saw the greatness of it at the end.” The experience prompted him to pursue a master’s in special education from Loyola Marymount University and opened his eyes to the powers of legal training.

Throughout his tenure as a teacher, Kacou saw an alarming trend: his seventh- and eighth-grade students first entered his class, many were reading at second grade or lower levels. Instead of assisting these children at the primary-school level, other teachers were pushing them through the system without addressing their needs, forcing the students to perpetually play catch-up. By the time the students reached high school, they might not have what they need to succeed with their education.

“I wanted to go to law school to change this,” he says. By enacting policy changes, he hopes to help Angeleno special needs students realize their full potentials. “I want to advocate for special needs and ensure that they’re getting the service that they need to get every step of the way.”

As a law student, Kacou has found a niche in public-interest law. He is co-chair of the Public Interest Law Fair’s Casino & Auction Night, Loyola’s largest on-campus fundraiser, which supports students’ pro bono summer legal work. And he has already secured a coveted post-graduation position: He will serve as law clerk to the Hon. Ferdinand F. Fernandez, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.