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January-March 2017

 

Teen Vogue – 03.31.17

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT GERRYMANDERING

In some states, though, independent and bipartisan commissions draw the maps instead. You can see which state uses which process on this map from Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, professor Justin Levitt.


KABC-TV – 03.30.17

LOYOLA PROJECT FOR THE INNOCENT SUCCESSES

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Laurie Levenson and student advocate Alexa Horner ‘18 of the Loyola Project for the Innocent speak to KABC-TV’s Miriam Hernandez live in-studio about their recent successes.

It’s one thing I don’t understand, but it’s been true for all of our exonerees. They’re not bitter. They’re not angry. They’re just grateful.


San Bernardino County Law Enforcement – 03.30.17

PROSECUTOR’S COMMENTS SPUR BACKLASH BY SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY LAW ENFORCEMENT

Laurie Levenson, a criminal law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, said Thursday she was not surprised so much by what Bulloch said during his closing argument as she was about his apology. “I don’t find it unusual for prosecutors to argue during a closing argument that certain law enforcement officers have a culture of violence,” Levenson said in a telephone interview. “I don’t think it was meant to taint the entire department.”


The Loyola Law School Project for the Innocent secured the release of Andrew Wilson, a client who served 32 years in prison. It was covered by a variety of outlets including the Associated Press, Christian Science Monitor, Ebony Magazine, Fox 11, KABC-TV, KNBC-TV, KPCC-FM,  KTLA-TV, Irish Legal News, Los Angeles Times, Law.com, MSN Taiwan, Sky News, Sky News Australia, Telegraphy UK and many others.


The Loyola Law School Project for the Innocent secured the release of Marco Contreras, a client who served 20 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. It was covered by a variety of outlets including the Associated Press, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, ABC News, NBC, CBS, KPCC, Salon, People, The Sun, Boston Herald, Sky News, CBS, Yahoo, LAist, Telemundo, Sin Embargo, The Root, KTLA, KCAL, Sky News, San Francisco Chronicle, and may others.


Los Angeles Times – 03.29.17

LEGAL STAKES ARE AT PLAY IN CALIFORNIA’S CASE AGAINST ANTI-ABORTION ACTIVISTS 

The law against secret recordings, however, does not shield journalists, Loyola Law School Professor Laurie Levenson said. “Even citizen journalists have to comply with criminal statutes,” she said. “That is the bottom line.”


New York Journal of Books – 03.29.17

THE NEW CRIMINAL JUSTICE THINKING

Edited by Sharon Dolovich, professor at UCLA School of Law and Director of the UCLA Prison Law and Policy Program, and Alexandra Natapoff, professor and Assistant Dean for Research at Loyola Law School, The New Criminal Justice Thinking provides a broad and comprehensive framework from which anyone can gain an understanding of the powerful forces that drive the criminal justice system.


Los Angeles Daily Journal – 03.29.17

CRIMINAL JUSTICE AWARDS AT LOYOLA

Loyola Law School held its annual Fidler Institute on Criminal Justice on March 24, a daylong series of seminars on hot-button criminal justice issues that was capped with awards to outstanding members of the Los Angeles County legal community and justice system. From left, Loyola Law School Professor Laurie L. Levenson; Assistant District Attorney William Hodgman, recipient of the Prosecutor of the Year award; former Public Defender Ronald L. Brown, Defense Lawyer of the Year; Judge Larry P. Fidler; Judge James R. Brandlin, Judge of the Year; Arent Fox LLP partner Mary Carter Andrues, recipient of the Special Award for Commitment to Justice; and Deputy Sheriff Nicholas D. Neri, recipient of the Special Service Award.


KPFK-FM – 03.28.17

IMMIGRANTS: KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

Loyola Immigrant Justice Clinic Staff Attorney Sandra Ruiz discusses the impact of President Trump’s openly hostile take on so-called sanctuary cities and what undocumented immigrants can do to protect themselves.

Everyone has constitutional rights in this country….So we tell people that for the person approaching their house, ask them to identify themselves. If it’s going to be ICE or a law-enforcement agency, they need to have a search warrant.”


Hogan Lovells  - 03.27.17

HOGAN LOVELLS ACADEMIC ALL-STARS DEBATE HOT TECH TOPICS

Chris Mammen, an IPMT partner in our San Francisco office, interviewed Seagull Song, Professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles and one of the world’s leading scholars on Chinese IP law. Seagull thinks that M&A trends, particularly in the media and entertainment space, will be a hot topic for China in 2017, including the regulatory challenges for cross-border investment in China and whether there will also be reverse difficulties for Chinese companies investing in the US or EU. Seagull also gave us an insight into the debate in China around the increase in creative content being produced by AI and whether and how that content might be protected by copyright.


Detroit Fashion News – 03.24.17

THE LOYOLA LAW SCHOOL, LOS ANGELES FASHION LAW PROJECT AND LOYOLA OF LOS ANGELES ENTERTAINMENT LAW REVIEW WILL HOST ‘THE CREATIVE RESPONSE TO POLITICAL DISRUPTION

The Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Fashion Law Project and the Loyola of Los Angeles Entertainment Law Review will host “The Creative Response to Political Disruption” to delve into the intersection of fashion, pop culture and politics on Friday, April 7, 2017 on Loyola’s downtown L.A. campus.


SCOTUSblog – 03.27.17

MONDAY ROUND-UP ON GORSUCH HEARINGS

Last week the Senate Judiciary Committee wrapped up its hearing on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court. Commentary comes from...Allan Ides in The Sacramento Bee.”


KCAL-TV – 03.26.17

REVISING THE TAX CODE AND SCOTUS NOMINATION

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson discusses plans for tax reform in light of Congress’ failed attempt to overhaul the Affordable Care Act.

I think this was a big motivating factor in making candidate Trump President Trump. A lot of people feel like the tax structure works against them. And people on all levels of the tax base actually feel this way. I think given what happened this week, it will be a little more challenging for President Trump.


Indisputably - 03.25.17

COME TO THE LEGAL EDUCATORS’ COLLOQUIUM

The ABA Section of Dispute Resolution’s Spring Conference is now less than a month away – April 19-22 in San Francisco. Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Hiro Aragaki will participate in The New “Gold Standard” in Teaching ADR: Tools, Strategies, Practices.


The Kansas City Star – 03.24.17

STAR BRIGHTS, CELEBRATING THE POSITIVE PEOPLE AND EVENTS AROUND US

Loyola Law School’s Project for the Innocent eventually took on the case, and Wilson was released from prison two weeks ago after prosecutors admitted suppressing that the victim’s girlfriend, who was with him when he was killed, had stabbed him in the past. She picked Wilson out of a photo lineup only after a police detective asked if he was the one. Now, Davis will welcome him home after 33 years and says she has a long list of chores she has been saving for her son.


The Sacramento Bee – 03.24.17

AFFECTED VOTERS SHOULD HAVE A SAY IN CALIFORNIA REDISTRICTING COMMISSIONS

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles’ Professor Jessica Levinson writes an op-ed on independent redistricting reform and the harm it can do voters.

Sometimes left out of the equation is how district lines will affect various communities. This harms voters. Enter independent redistricting commissions, which take the power to draw district lines out of the hands of lawmakers and put that power in a separate group of citizens. These commissions are growing in popularity, and in many cases, including in California, voters have seen the benefits of independent redistricting.


KGO-AM – 03.23.17

A MAJOR RULING ON EDUCATION FROM THE SUPREME COURT FOR KIDS WITH DISABILITIES

Dean Michael Waterstone anticipates the repercussions of the Supreme Court ruling in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District. The opinion holds schools to a higher standard for the services they provide to students with disabilities.

“Yesterday’s decision that applies nationwide dealt with issue of how much or what types of services schools need to provide to kids with disabilities,” said Waterstone. “In the opinion yesterday, unanimously the Supreme Court said that...schools need to take measures that are reasonably calculated to give this child the appropriate benefit given their individualized circumstances.”


The Sacramento Bee – 03.23.17

DO WE REALLY WANT AN ‘ORIGINALIST’ SUPREME COURT JUSTICE?

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Allan Ides writes an op-ed on Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch’s originalist approach toward interpreting the Constitution.

Originalism is usually endorsed as the alternative to a regime under which judges are free to rewrite the law in service to their personal vision of morality. This appears to be Gorsuch’s view. But the sensible alternative to originalism is not free-range activism, but pragmatism, a perspective that can accommodate a wide range of political views.


Orange County Register - 03.21.17

2 JAILHOUSE SNITCHES, WHO WERE PAID $335,000 OVER 4 YEARS, SPARK A NEW LAW

Alexandra Natapoff, an expert on informants and a professor at Loyola Law School, said California is behind other states in regulating the use of jailhouse snitches, but the bill would be an important start….She added that while monetary incentives would be capped, the bill does not address the most important reward for informants: leniency in their own criminal cases. “It’s a great first step and the lesson from Orange County has only begun to resonate in Sacramento,” Natapoff said.


Angelus News – 03.21.17

L.A. AREA WORKSHOPS TO FOCUS ON IMMIGRANT RIGHTS AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR IMMIGRANT FAMILIES

On Tuesday, March 21, Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti’s Office of Immigrant Affairs will team with the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, Loyola Marymount University Law School, Bet Tzedek and the National Immigration Law Center to present a “Know Your Rights” workshop at Dolores Mission Parish in Los Angeles. A team of experts will be on hand providing information on immigrant rights and on President Trump’s executive orders on immigration. They will also be offering information on emergency preparedness for families and communities who may be affected by the immigration policies.


AJ+/Al Jazeera Plus English

THE SUPREME COURT JUSTICE NOMINEE IS AN “ORIGINALIST.” WHAT DOES THAT MEAN?

 “The philosophy of originalism posits that the Constitution should be interpreted in precisely the same way as it would have been understood when adopted in 1789,” says Professor Allan Ides of Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, “no women, no slaves, no native Americans. There is no way that generation could have predicted the world of today.”


Associazone Luca Coscioni  - 03.09.17

MESSICO: 3 TEMI SU CUI RIFORMARE [via Google Translate]

Thanks to the work of the International Human Rights Clinic at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, directed by Cesare Romano, professor of international law, and the Association Luca Coscioni for freedom of scientific research, was presented to the UN Committee on social and economic rights a sort of "independent report" on Mexico focused on three specific topics that fall under the umbrella of the "right to science."


The Wall Street Journal – 03.19.17

SHOULD COLLEGE STUDENTS BE REQUIRED TO TAKE A COURSE IN PERSONAL FINANCE?

Lauren E. Willis, professor of law and Rains senior research fellow at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, looks at reasons why such courses shouldn’t be required, topped by what she says is a lack of evidence that they are effective.

Making personal-finance courses a college requirement sends a message that financial success is largely the result of personal decisions. But government policies affecting employment, health care and benefits have a vastly greater effect than personal financial acumen on Americans’ financial health. The main causes of bankruptcy are medical expenses, pay cuts, job loss and divorce, not profligate spending. Credit cards, payday loans and overdrafts are used as band-aids in emergencies, and spiraling fees can widen the gash, but financial wounds are usually inflicted by hardship and fraud—not poor money management.


Los Angeles Times – 03.19.17

TWO SHERIFFS ELECTED AS REFORMERS END UP DESTROYED BY CORRUPTION SCANDALS

Laurie Levenson, criminal justice professor at Loyola Law School, said the men’s downfalls were different...“Even if Baca is found guilty, his crime is not the same ilk as Carona’s, which was more significant and more clear-cut,” Levenson said in an interview before the retrial...“[Baca’s] albatross was and always will be the jails.”


St. Louis Post-Dispatch – 03.19.17

MISSOURI BEGINS VOTER ID ROLLOUT AMID QUESTIONS ABOUT MONEY AND NECESSITY 

Justin Levitt, a researcher at the Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, has determined that out of 1 billion ballots cast from 2000 to 2014, 31 were cast by someone pretending to be someone else.


Mass Torts Nexus – 03.18.17

BELLWETHER MEDIATION IN MASS TORT LITIGATION PROMOTES SETTLEMENTS

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Adam Zimmerman’s article “Bellwether Settlements” in discussed. An excerpt appears below.

The embrace of such “bellwether settlements” raises new questions about the roles of the judge and jury in mass litigation. What function do courts serve when large cases push judges outside their traditional roles as adjudicators of adverse claims, supervisors of controlled fact-finding, and interpreters of law?


The Sacramento Bee – 03.18.17

TRUMP'S BASELESS CLAIMS ARE UNDERMINING CONFIDENCE IN VOTING

In a comprehensive study by Justin Levitt of Loyola Law School, only 31 instances of voter fraud were found in more than 1 billion votes cast in U.S. elections between 2000 and 2014. Secretary of State Alex Padilla’s office is examining only 423 of the 23 million total votes cast in California’s 2016 primary and general elections, the nonpartisan journalism nonprofit CALmatters reported. And not one of these cases involves allegations of voting by an undocumented immigrant.


KJZZ-FM – 03.16.17

WHAT'S BEHIND SPIKE IN CELL-PHONE SEARCHES AT BORDER?

The Department of Homeland Security said that in 2015 border agents searched around 5,000 cell phones. They searched that many just last month. So, what’s behind the jump, and what are border agents allowed — and not allowed — to do with your phone when you’re coming into the country? To help answer those questions, I’m joined by Stan Goldman, a law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.

Technology is always about 10 years ahead of the law. The theory has always been that at the borders there is almost absolute control of people being searched. The fourth amendment, the protection against search and seizures, does not really begin until you’re actually, officially on American soil.


Los Angeles Times – 03.16.17

TRUMP FACES MAJOR HURDLES — AND HIS OWN WORDS — IN CHALLENGING ORDERS AGAINST HIS NEW TRAVEL BAN

 “If there’s a split between the two appeals courts, then it could possibly go to the Supreme Court for review,” said Jessica Levinson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.


KPCC-FM – 03.16.17

WHY DO WE ELECT OUR SHERIFFS?

For more, Jessica Levinson from Loyola Law School spoke to A Martinez. She broke down where the sheriff election system comes from, why it may never go away and how this system is set up to lack diversity.

Sheriff’s are elected and that’s because it’s in the California Constitution...This was a common practice when states were creating their own constitutions that chief law enforcement officer in a county would be an elected official.


Los Angeles Country Bar Association -03.16.17

LACBA VETERANS LEGAL SERVICES PROJECT

The Valor Guide is an index of legal service providers for veterans in Los Angeles County area, compiled by Loyola Law School at the direction of Committee Chair, Adam Siegler.


U.S. News & World Report – 03.14.17

AMERICA’S BEST GRADUATE SCHOOLS 2018 (password required)

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles is ranked No. 65 out of 197 law schools in the country in the newest edition of the U.S. News law school rankings. Loyola’s Tax Law program, ranked in the top 10 for eight of the last nine years, is ranked No. 6. Loyola’s Trial Advocacy program rose two spots to No. 6, and has been ranked in the top 10 for 10 of the last 12 years. In Legal Writing, Loyola is ranked No. 27. Loyola’s Evening Division Program rose two spots to No. 9, remaining the top-ranked part-time law program on the West Coast.


The Washington Times – 03.14.17

TRUMP’S REVISED TRAVEL BAN MUST FIRST SURVIVE CHALLENGES IN COURTS

 “The new executive order suffers from the same pitfalls as the first one,” said Kathleen Kim, who teaches immigration law at the Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. “The travel ban is still clearly making a discriminatory preference for Christian foreign nationals as opposed to Muslim foreign nationals seeking entry.”


The Sacramento Bee – 03.13.17

SUPER PAC DIDN’T DERAIL TRUMP, BUT IT DID BOOST VILLARAIGOSA’S GOVERNOR BID

Politicians often use PACs to support or oppose a candidate, or advance issues and legislation, while trying to boost their careers, said Jessica Levinson, a law professor and ethics expert at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. “It doesn’t look like it was being used to illegally line pockets,” Levinson said of the PAC’s spending. But, she added, “In a most cynical scenario, it looks like it was being used as a precursor to a campaign committee.”


Korea Daily – 03.14.17

MEDIATION SAVES TIME AND MONEY

Jeff Lee’s inspiration behind his volunteered work was his yearning to find his best skills 40 years after he moved to the U.S. After learning about the role of a mediator through the Korea Daily’s reporting last September, Lee enrolled in the mediator program at Loyola Law School. He has since began voluntary work as a mediator at Happy Village after completing his studies.


Los Angeles Daily Journal – 03.07.17

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS, REFUGE FOR UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS, AND TAX EXEMPTION

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Ellen Aprill assesses in a new op-ed the potential tax implications to houses of worship that serve as so-called “sanctuaries” for undocumented immigrants.

Houses of worship and religious organizations face some risk, at least in theory, of losing exemption for such activity. As a practical matter, loss of exemption is unlikely, but the organization needs to document the religious basis for its actions and the criteria it will use.


LLM Guide – 03.07.17

TOP LLM PROGRAMS FOR U.S. TAX LAW 2017

Loyola Law School in Los Angeles offers a rigorous graduate tax program with an application process that is more selective than the school’s JD. Students on the Tax LL.M. have the opportunity to gain practical experience at the school’s numerous law clinics that serve on small cases, taxpayer appeals, and non-profit cases, among others. Loyola also offers a joint JD/LL.M. in just two years, as well as a Master in Taxation for non-lawyers who wish to enhance their careers with the same tax law training available to law graduates in the LL.M. program. The Loyola Tax Policy Colloquium hosts tax scholars speaking on current tax law concepts and challenges.


KCRW-FM – 03.06.17

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE ABOUT LOS ANGELES' MARCH 7 ELECTION

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson evaluates the possible outcomes of a range of ballot initiatives.


TaxProf Blog – 03.07.17

SETO: DOES THE INCOME TAX CAUSE PARENTS TO SPEND TOO MUCH TIME WITH THEIR CHILDREN?

Loyola Law School, Los AngelesProfessor Theodore P. Seto article “Does the Income Tax Cause Parents to Spend Too Much Time with Their Children?: Rethinking Mirrlees” is featured.


Legal Theory Blog – 03.06.17

SETO ON MIRRLEES ON OPTIMAL INCOME TAXATION

Loyola Law School, Los AngelesProfessor Theodore P. Seto article “Does the Income Tax Cause Parents to Spend Too Much Time with Their Children?: Rethinking Mirrlees” is “recommended” by Legal Theory Blog.


KCAL-TV – 03.12.17

CONGRESS DEMANDS EVIDENCE OF PRESIDENT TRUMP'S WIRETAP ALLEGATIONS

Professor Jessica Levinson, of Loyola Law School, explains how easy it would be for the president to prove his claim that Obama wiretapped Trump Tower during the election.


The Christian Science Monitor – 03.12.17

IS TIME RUNNING OUT ON DAYLIGHT SAVING?

 “Let’s just not ignore the fact that people are happy when it’s light out longer,” Jessica Levinson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, told The Mercury News. “It just seems like a terrible idea to reduce the number of daylight hours we can enjoy. Why would the dead hand of the government come in and tell us there should be more darkness?”


CNN – 03.09.17

COLD CASE SPECIAL PROSECUTOR MAY BE TARGET OF A SPECIAL PROSECUTOR

"He should recuse himself," said Laurie Levenson, a former federal prosecutor who teaches ethics and advocacy at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "It sounds like he's the wrong guy to be handling this right now."


San Francisco Chronicle – 03.10.17

TRUMP DRAWS FROM AUTHORITARIAN PLAYBOOK

“Donald Trump’s whole narrative has been to foster distrust of government institutions,” said Jessica Levinson, a Loyola Law School professor who specializes in election law and governance issues. His message, she said, is “you can’t trust anyone but him.” When that happens, she said, it leads to “a feeling of helplessness” among the citizenry.


KABC-AM – 03.10-17

HOW TO GET PEOPLE TO THE POLLS

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson goes on KABC-AM to discuss the recent local election and how to get people to go to the polls.

You can say once we've made it so easy for people to get the polls do we want to drag people kicking and screaming? And the other is that it is true that it's a huge problem in a “representative government” when we don't pick representatives. We have a voting class.


KNX-1070 AM – 03.09.17

BACA TAKING THE STAND - A RISKY DECISION

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Laurie Levenson weighs in on possible outcomes of Baca taking the stand in his retrial.

“If he gets on the witness stand and he sounds articulate then the jurors can say he must have known what was going on. On the other hand, if he gets on the stand and he’s not able to answer the questions it’s going to be pathetic and he could easily get trapped by prosecutors.


Bloomberg – 03.08.17

TRUMP'S IMMIGRATION MOVES MEET RISING WAVE OF CHALLENGES

The updated executive order has done a good job of at least hiding those motivations, making the religious discrimination argument less convincing in court, said Allan Ides, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. “You can point to all of that, but I don’t think that’s going to serve as strong evidence, especially after the White House backed down and changed things,” said Ides, who served as a court-appointed counsel on immigration cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals in San Francisco from 2004 to 2006. “It starts looking like a foolish exercise of executive power, but not necessarily an unconstitutional one.”


Wall Street Journal – 03.07.17

LOW TURNOUT EXPECTED FOR LOS ANGELES MAYORAL ELECTION

With Republicans now in power in Washington, progressives will be seeking to push their elected officials nationally to take a more combative stance toward Mr. Trump, said Jessica A. Levinson, a professor at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles. That means a second term for Mr. Garcetti could look very different from his first, which overlapped almost entirely with President Barack Obama in the White House. “He does not have the benefit of having a friendly relationship with the president; he is not going to have the luxury of saying ‘I agree with the president.’ He is going to have to decide where and how to wage his battles,” Ms. Levinson said.


KNX-1070 AM – 03.07.17

WILL PEOPLE GO TO THE POLLS?

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson discusses the expected low voter turnout at the recent election.

The caveat is that you see a serious uptick in civic activism since the inauguration. People have been literally marching in the streets on weekends...Will that uptick translate into more people at the ballot box?


KPCC-FM – 02.23.17

JUDGE HALTS ENFORCEMENT OF STATE LAW THAT CURBED PUBLICATION OF ACTORS' AGES

But IMDb's argument that the law is a violation of the First Amendment may not be easily countered, according to Aaron H. Caplan, a professor at Loyola Law School. "The First Amendment gives very strong protection to people's ability to say truthful things about the world. There are some protections if someone is defaming you — saying false things about you," Caplan says. "But the idea that someone could be breaking the law by saying something that is true is very unusual."


Associated Press – 02.24.17

A LOOK AT THE LEGAL PATH AHEAD FOR THE TRUMP TRAVEL BAN

But it may not be that easy for the administration to escape the shadow of the current challenge before the 9th Circuit, said Simona Grossi, an expert in federal court procedure at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. The new order would have to be free of the constitutional problems raised by the original order and the administration would also have to show that the original order will not be resurrected in the future, she said.


Orange County Register – 02.23.17

WHAT ARE YOUR RIGHTS? EXPERTS ANSWER QUESTIONS ON SELF-DEFENSE AND POLICE USE OF FORCE

In light of the confrontation between an off-duty LAPD officer and a 13-year-old boy in Anaheim on Tuesday, Greg Block, a Huntington Beach-based law enforcement instructor and self-defense expert, and Loyola Law School professor Laurie Levinson, answer some questions on self-defense and police use of force.

If someone is on your property without permission, you have a right to ask the police to remove them for trespass or you can sue them. We don't have a self-help system where you get to physically threaten or remove people.


KPCC-FM – 02.23.17

POPULAR MISCONCEPTIONS OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS & CONSTITUTION

To help celebrate President's Day, AirTalk will pore over the Bill of Rights with Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Constitutional scholar Professor Aaron Caplan. According to Caplan, a big picture misconception about the document is that it exists to limit the federal government. Caplan says, "Actually, [the Constitution] exists to create a federal government. The Framers wanted an 'energetic' government. To be sure, the Constitution includes limits on what this new government can do, but the main purpose was to create government power."


Ventura County Star – 02.22.17

ICE DETENTION OF INMATES DECLINES IN COUNTY

Emily Robinson, co-director of Loyola Law School's Immigrant Justice Clinic, said the reinstatement of the Secure Communities program already has caused confusion..."If I have a client who is a visa violator and they are otherwise entitled to have their child, who is a U.S. citizen, to petition for their parent to get a green card, are they going to instead be served with a notice to appear in immigration court or will be given a removal order? I have no idea," Robinson said. "This will be problematic for many people."


TruthDig – 02.23.17

CHALLENGING TRUMP ON IMMIGRATION

Emily Robinson, LIJC co-director, joined the Truthdig team Thursday to discuss the legality of Trump’s new policies. Alejandro Barajas, a staff attorney for the LIJC, also took part in the discussion. Watch the discussion in the video above.


Telemundo – 02.22.17

COULD ALL UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS IN THE U.S. BE DEPORTED?

Loyola Immigrant Justice Clinic Co-Director Marissa Montes explains the challenged faced by the Trump administration in deporting undocumented immigrants en masse.


San Francisco Chronicle – 02.22.17

SF HAS BOLD PROPOSAL TO PROTECT MUSLIMS

Jessica Levinson, a professor at Loyola Law School and a member of the Los Angeles Ethics Commission, agreed: “They are throwing the courthouse doors open. You are telling people that the city will defend against these suits and use taxpayer dollars to do it,” she said. “Having said that, it’s one of the most powerful ways San Francisco can say, ‘We are putting our money where our mouth is.’”


KNX-1070 AM – 02.22.17

JURY SELECTION IN RETRIAL OF FORMER SHERIFF BEGINS

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Laurie Levenson weighs-in on how the judge’s pre-trial rulings have made this an uphill battle for the defense.

They’re not going to be able to call character witnesses who  lay out all the good acts Baca might have done in the past. They could just get up there generally, say they have  a good opinion of him, and then the prosecutor is going to attack that with all the bad acts they think he’s done. 


The Mercury News – 02.19.17

FEC DEMOCRATIC MEMBER ANN RAVEL RESIGNS POST

Jessica Levinson, a politics and ethics professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles who knows Ravel, said the “dysfunctional” nature of the commission, which features three Democrats and three Republicans, hasn’t always been this stark. “Right now it’s a total disaster,” she said. “People know that on the federal level they can get away with whatever they want, because they have three Republican commissioners who are going to vote no on anything.”


KPCC-FM – 02.17.17

JUDGE: FORMER LA SHERIFF BACA CAN'T USE ALZHEIMER'S AS DEFENSE

"There's the first trial issue for appeal," said Stan Goldman, a professor at Loyola Law School and former L.A. County public defender. "It struck me immediately that the defense's best argument here was his mental condition," he said.


Law & Humanities Blog – 02.20.17

MURRAY ON TRUMP'S WALL @LOYOLALAWSCHOOL

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Yxta Maya Murray’s plans to publishthe article “A Modest Memo” in the Michigan Journal of Race & Law are highlighted.

A Modest Memo is a satire in the form of a legal memo written for President-Elect Donald Trump circa November 2016. It counsels Mr. Trump to obtain Mexican funding for a U.S.-Mexico “Wall” via United Nations Security Council sanctions….The memo, which is entirely the product of my imagination and legal study, contemplates one of the many possible worst case scenarios threatened by the Trump presidency.


Los Angeles Newspaper Group – 02.18.17

SUSPECT IN RAPE OF ELDERLY MENTONE WOMAN HAD HISTORY OF VIOLENT OFFENSES

 “There’s no question the system didn’t do its job on this one,” said Stan Goldman, a criminal law professor at Loyola Law School. “It seems like everything went wrong. This is a worst case scenario for sure.”


Associated Press – 02.17.17

TRUMP SEEKS PAUSE IN LEGAL FIGHT WITH REVISED TRAVEL BAN

Jessica Levinson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, believes Trump would eliminate some major problems with the new focus. "But I think that it will definitely still end up in court," she said.


Riverside Press-Enterprise – 02.20.17

SAN BERNARDINO SHOOTER'S FRIEND PLEADS GUILTY TO CONSPIRACY, FALSE STATEMENTS

Laurie Levenson, a professor of law at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles and a former assistant U.S. attorney, said a plea deal in the Marquez case made sense. A trial had been scheduled for September. “I think the defendant and the government didn’t have anything to gain by going to trial,” Levenson said.


Associated Press – 02.17.17

FROM NATE PARKER TO MEL GIBSON, HOLLYWOOD'S SLIDING SCALE OF JUSTICE

Stan Goldman, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, believes the internet makes the public less likely to let go of old cases. "There's a reason the law has statues of limitations. We don't want somebody's past continuing to haunt them," says Goldman. "But maybe time should not heal all wounds. Our crimes should, perhaps, follow us. But there should be some basis for it."


Legal Theory Blog – 02.16.17

GROSSI ON THE CLAIM IN THE FEDERAL RULES OF CIVIL PROCEDURE

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Simona Grossi’s article “The Claim” is featured.

My article is intended to offer a comprehensive study of the claim and the role of the claim in the various doctrines that govern procedure in federal courts. Based on that understanding, the article develops a theory of federal practice and procedure that centers on the claim, a theory that assigns to the claim a primary, and yet a non-dispositive role in litigation analysis.


Associated Press – 02.16.17

TRUMP SEEKS PAUSE IN LEGAL FIGHT WITH REVISED TRAVEL BAN

Jessica Levinson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, believes Trump would eliminate some major problems with the new focus. "But I think that it will definitely still end up in court," she said.


Voice of San Diego – 02.15.17

SDPD FINDS A WAY AROUND STATE LAW LIMITING DNA COLLECTION FROM JUVENILES

Experts I spoke to about the department’s policy were unaware of any other law enforcement agencies in California that collect DNA from juveniles in the field. They acknowledged a local database is a way to get around state rules, but said it also undermines the intent of the law’s strict limits. Even juveniles who admit their guilt aren’t necessarily required to provide a DNA sample, said Kevin Lapp, a Loyola Law School professor. “If DNA collection isn’t permitted then it’s hard to justify street-stop collection from someone who is presumed innocent,” he said.


San Francisco Chronicle – 02.14.17

BOYCOTTING COMPANIES TIED TO PRESIDENT NEW WEAPON IN U.S. POLITICS

 “People want an outlet to voice their concerns immediately,” said Jessica Levinson, a professor of law and a political analyst at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. “One thing we’ve seen in the past few weeks is a growth in political activism, with people willing to show how they feel by voting with their Visas.”


The Loyolan – 02.15.17

BLACK STUDENT SERVICES HOSTS '13TH' SCREENING AND PANEL

Participants at last Saturday’s screening of Ava DuVernay’s critically acclaimed Netflix documentary “13th” engaged in discussion about mass incarceration and the prison industrial complex. The event, sponsored by Loyola Law School’s chapter of the National Black Law Students Association and Black Student Services (BSS), was followed by a panel discussion with LMU faculty and leaders from the greater Los Angeles community.


Legal News – 02.14.17

WAYNE LAW REVIEW SYMPOSIUM ON DRUG POLICY SET FOR MARCH 24

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Priscilla Ocen is announced as a keynote speaker at the 2017 Wayne Law Review Symposium.


Herald & News – 02.14.17

WHY WOULD TRUMP THINK HE COULD WIN ON HIS TRAVEL BAN?

Loyola Law School professor Jessica Levinson, a critic of the executive order, argued that the court needed to send the message the president should not be “un-reviewable” — especially for an order considered by many to be a “Muslim ban.”


KFI-AM – 02.10.17

WHO DOES THE CONSTITUTION PROTECT?

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson analyses the Ninth Circuit’s ruling upholding the stay on the President Trump’s travel ban.

The Equal Protection clause says “persons” -- that’s why it affects residents, visa holders, people who are in the country. But there is an argument that it protects people who want to come here…The Ninth Circuit yesterday didn’t decide this for sure, it’s just about if the district court was correct in pushing pause on the implementation of the executive order.


The Desert Sun – 02.10.17

CALIFORNIA COULD BECOME A SANCTUARY STATE. HERE'S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

 “The biggest misconception is that people think that when you declare yourself a sanctuary it means that there is absolutely no contact with ICE and that is not true,” said Marissa Montes, co-director of the Loyola Immigrant Justice Clinic at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles. “If ICE wanted to have a raid in downtown LA and did everything procedurally correct, like get a warrant, the city would not be able to stop them.”


RNZ – 02.10.17

US LAW PROFESSOR SAYS TRUMP IS FIGHTING LOSING BATTLE

US law professor and political commentator Jessica Levinson says the lower court's decision on Donald Trump's travel ban will stand, regardless of whether it is taken to the Supreme Court. “Today was vindicating in that we have three judges who were appointed by presidents of different political affiliations and they all came to the same conclusion. What we saw, frankly, was the judicial system working. What we saw was the American form of government working”


KCAL-TV – 02.09.17

APPEALS COURT UPHOLDS SUSPENSION OF TRUMP TRAVEL BAN

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Kevin Lapp joins Dave Bryan for a discussion on a unanimous decision rejecting Trump’s travel ban.

 “If they go the Supreme Court it’s going to be decided by an eight person Supreme Court. If that court splits 4-4, that means the ninth circuit decision stays in place with regards to the executive order.”


Associated Press – 02.09.17

REACTION TO COURT REFUSING TO REINSTATE TRUMP TRAVEL BAN

"It's a very important message that judges are not just politicians in robes and not just political hacks. The role of the judge is to transcend politics. That's why they're appointed for life, so they don't worry about what's popular, they worry about what's legally correct." — Jessica Levinson, professor at Loyola Law School.


KABC-LA – 02.09.17

NINTH CIRCUIT RULING

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Allan Ides appeared live on-set and in a taped segment to discuss the Ninth Circuit’s order upholding the stay on President Trump’s travel ban. “The issue that was decided today is that the President’s order is on hold until we resolve the second issues. Which is whether that order violates the Constitution.”


Los Angeles Times – 02.09.17

HOW WOULD THE SUPREME COURT REACT TO TRUMP OVER THE TRAVEL BAN? NOT WELL, SAY LEGAL EXPERTS

Jessica Levinson, a law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, said she thought the Supreme Court would take up the question of whether to reinstate the travel ban. "This is probably going to the Supreme Court, but I don't think it's going anywhere good for Donald Trump — even if the Supreme Court rules along party lines and is deadlocked, because the lower court's decision would stand."


Talking Points Memo – 02.09.17

TRUMP AND HIS LACKEYS LAND IN BIGGEST ETHICS QUAGMIRE YET WITH NORDSTROM DUSTUP

Jessica Levinson, a government ethics professor at Loyola Law School, told TPM that it constitutes a misuse of office every time Trump mentions one of his own products. She added that Trump's Wednesday tweet directed at Nordstrom was "more of the same" from a President who refused to divest from his businesses. "This is what a kleptocracy looks like," Levinson told TPM.


KNX 1070 AM – 02.09.17

UNANIMOUS DECISION ON TRAVEL BAN (No link available - live broadcast)

"This was a shellacking...the federal government really lost on all points," says Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson.


Los Angeles Times – 02.09.17

LIVE UPDATES: 9TH U.S. CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS RULES AGAINST TRUMP AND TRAVEL BAN WILL NOT GO INTO EFFECT

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson says “It's really important that the opinion is unanimous because judges that were appointed by Democratic and Republican presidents came to the same legal conclusion. This is probably going to the Supreme Court, but I don't think it's going anywhere good for Donald Trump — even if the Supreme Court rules along party lines and is deadlocked, because the lower court's decision would stand.”


Los Angeles Times – 02.07.17

WHY YOU SHOULDN'T READ TOO MUCH INTO ORAL ARGUMENTS IN TRUMP IMMIGRATION CASE

"It seemed like Washington state had a better argument. The Department of Justice attorney really struggled with articulating why the executive order had to remain in place," said Jessica Levinson, a law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles


LLM Guide – 02.06.17

PREVENTING FUTURE BREACHES: LL.M.S IN CYBERSECURITY

Loyola Law School in Los Angeles also just created a one-year LL.M. in Cybersecurity & Data Privacy Law last spring, which covers compliance, computer network security systems, incident response and investigation, systems engineers approach to internet security, and white-collar crime. Aaron Ghirardelli, the program director, says that the LL.M. focuses on training students to understand two fundamental issues: what to do before an attack, and what to do afterward.


LA Weekly – 01.25.17

L.A. CONGRESSMAN WANTS TO LIMIT TRUMP'S ACCESS TO NUKES

Loyola Law School professor David Glazier, a former Navy surface warfare officer, seemed to agree, saying that if a president could argue that the nation faced an imminent military threat, then he could probably deploy the weapons of his choice. The general language of Lieu's proposal "walks a fine line," he said. "The Constitution is very clear that president is commander in chief. It's not a shared power."


The Washington Post – 01.25.17

HERE ARE NINE INVESTIGATIONS ON VOTER FRAUD THAT FOUND VIRTUALLY NOTHING

In one of the most comprehensive investigations of fraud, Justin Levitt of Loyola Law School, Los Angeles turned up 31 credible instances of voter impersonation out of more than 1 billion votes cast between 2000 and 2014. Some of those cases may have been because of clerical errors. Levitt's investigation suggests that while voter impersonation does indeed happen, it happens so rarely that the rate is approximately one instance out of ever 32 million ballots cast. This is similar to the odds of getting “heads” 25 times in a row on a coin toss.


CNN – 01.24.17

TRUMP OPENS INVESTIGATION ON VOTER FRAUD

 “I think it was [a study in] 2014, overseen by a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.”


Ventura Country Star – 01.23.17

AUTHORITIES EXTEND REACH IN DRUG DEATHS

Laurie Levenson, Loyola Law School criminal law professor, said that because of the growing problem of heroin and prescription drug abuse, prosecutors across the country are treating overdose cases as high priorities."Oftentimes when legislators want to highlight an issue, they want to pass new laws, but that's not a magic bullet," Levenson said. "There are already laws in the books, so what you basically need to do is be thorough in the investigation and focus on the worst cases. This has a potential to be a deterrent when word goes out that prosecutors are aggressively pursuing these types of cases."


Talking Points Memo – 01.23.17

DOJ SHOULDN'T HAVE HAD TO APPROVE KUSHNER HIRE TO BEGIN WITH, EXPERTS SAY

Jessica Levinson, a professor of government ethics at Loyola Law School, argued that while the legal reasoning may be sound, it was “unfortunate” that Trump was opting to “skirt around” federal law. Levinson pointed out that all previous Presidents in modern history had voluntarily taken steps to minimize conflicts of interest and adhere to anti-nepotism statutes.


Mic.com – 01.23.17

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP DOUBLES DOWN ON VOTER FRAUD LIES

In-person voter fraud on an individual level is rare, let alone systemic. A 2014 investigation by Loyola Law School constitutional law expert Justin Levitt found 31 credible incidents across the country from 2000 to 2014, out of more than 1 billion votes cast. It happens less than people get hit by lightning. If anything, Republican-backed measures across the country to make voting requirements stricter, close down polling places and redistrict voting precincts to isolate Democrats have rigged the game in favor of Trump's party.


Los Angeles Times – 01.23.17

HOW MUCH MONEY IS YOUR VOTE WORTH? HERE'S WHAT CALIFORNIA HOUSE CANDIDATES SPENT IN 2016

“Spending a lot of money seems to have a pretty direct correlation to your outcome, with a few exceptions,” said Jessica Levinson, a professor and election law expert at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.


KCAL-TV-01.21.17

TRUMP’S ATTEMPT AT REPENTANCE AT CIA ATTACK ON MEDIA by KCAL-TV

 “It was an effort to mend fences, but he politicized it in a way that, frankly, we haven’t seen in the past,” Jessica Levinson, law professor at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles.


Los Angeles Daily Journal – 01.20.17

CAN A SECOND JURY HEAR A FIRST JURY’S VERDICT? (password required)

Laurie L. Levenson, a professor at Loyola Law School, said she found it problematic to allow the previous jury's verdict into a retrial. "What you want is the jury deciding on the evidence they have, not on what prior decision makers did or did not do."


KCAL-TV -01.20.17

LIVE COVERAGE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURATION (password required)

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson provides live analysis of the Inauguration ceremony and its speeches.


San Francisco Chronicle – 01.20.17

WITH TRUMP INAUGURATION, U.S. ENTERS GREAT UNKNOWN

People thinking that they will see a new, restrained and more presidential Trump after he takes the oath of office Friday haven’t been paying attention, said Jessica Levinson, a professor and political commentator at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. Trump is “not going to have a personality transplant” after he’s inaugurated, she said. “Fundamentally, the thing he trusts most is his gut, and his gut doesn’t need to go through briefing books.”


KPCC-FM – 01.19.17

DEBATING COUNCILMEMBER BONIN’S ‘CLEAN MONEY’ ELECTION REFORMS

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson assesses the potential efficacy of a motion that would boost public funding of campaigns.


San Francisco Chronicle – 01.19.2017

WIDOW PLEADS NOT GUILTY TO HELPING HUSBAND IN ORLANDO MASSACRE

“If they know at some stage she was a willing participant, they want to send the message: Don’t help a would-be terrorist, even if it’s your husband,” said Laurie Levenson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles and a former federal prosecutor.


Above the Law – 01.18.17

LAW SCHOOL DEANS ASK FOR EXTENSION ON EXPLOITATION

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Dean Michael Waterstone was among more than 90 law school deans who signed a letter urging the ABA to reconsider a proposed rule change regarding bar-exam passage.


Bloomberg Radio – 01.13.17

RAPPER ACCUSED OF GANG MEMBERSHIP BASED ON LYRICS

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Laurie Levenson discusses why a hip-hop musician and a community organizer have sued the city of San Diego for federal civil rights violations after they were jailed on gang-related charges based on their rap lyrics and social media postings. 


VOA News – 01.18.17

LOS ANGELES PLANS TO FIGHT TRUMP OVER IMMIGRATION

At the Los Angeles protest march, attorney Emily Robinson of the Loyola Law School Immigrant Justice Clinic said, "We're sending a message that Los Angeles is united for immigrants' rights, that we're going to stand strong. We're not colluding with ICE [Immigration and Customs Enforcement]."


KCRW-FM – 01.17.17

THE EFFORT TO BAN DEVELOPER DONATION

Professor Jessica Levinson discusses the push to ban political campaign contributions from developers who have projects pending before City Hall. 


The National Jurist – Winter 2017

BEST SCHOOLS FOR BAR EXAM PREPARATION

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles is named the top California law school for bar exam preparation.


Los Angeles Daily Journal – 01.17.17

INSIDE AGENCY CLASS ACTIONS (password required)

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Adam Zimmerman summarizes his recommendations for use of class-action tools in agency litigation.

That being said, when agencies do use collective procedures, they serve as vital tools for responding to rising case volumes while promoting legal access. Collective procedures can take a variety of forms. Agencies may, for instance, aggregate using formal rules, like class actions, or they may aggregate through more informal techniques, like assigning separate cases to the same adjudicator, venue or expedited docket. In many cases, agencies have recognized the power of these collective procedures, finding that they enhance efficiency, improve consistency and promote legal access.


KCBS-TV – 01.15.17

DONALD TRUMP'S LATEST TWITTER FEUD AND INAUGURATION DROP-OUT

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson weighs in on the latest controversies with the president-elect.

This is vintage Donald Trump where it’s a slam and it’s a criticism, but then there is something in there that says like maybe he’s reaching across aisle.


Gurvey’s Law Podcast – 01.14.17

LAW AND MAGIC

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jay Dougherty discusses how the law does (and doesn't) protect the rights of magicians.

Trade secrets have some value as long as you keep some things confidential...You can reverse engineer something...If someone can figure it out precisely then it’s not violating trade secrets. It’s very limited protection, but it is something.  


Legal Writing Prof Blog – 01.13.17

BOB BRAIN FINISHES TERM AS CHAIR OF AALS SECTION ON LEGAL WRITING, REASONING, AND RESEARCH; NEW CHAIR IS SABRINA DEFABRITIIS

Professor Bob Brain (Loyola Law School, Los Angeles) is pictured here with an exit sign at the end of his term as Chair of the Association of American Law Schools Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research. He now joins a distinguished list of former section chairs who have advocated for legal writing professors within the AALS and the legal education community


KABC-AM – 01.11.17

JEFF SESSIONS’ HEARING (password required)

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson discusses Jeff Sessions’ testimony before Congress.


Legal Theory Blog – 01.11.17

JAROS & ZIMMERMAN ON AGGREGATE SETTLEMENTS

Legal Theory Blog praises Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Adam Zimmerman’s forthcoming law review article “Judging Aggregate Settlement”  as “recommended.”

This Article maps the new and critical role that courts must play in policing aggregate settlements. We argue that judicial review should exist to alert and press other institutions—private associations of attorneys, government lawyers, and the coordinate branches of government—to reform bureaucratic approaches to settling cases. Such review would not mean interfering with the final outcome of any given settlement. Rather, judicial review would instead mean demanding more information about the parties’ competing interests in settlement, more participation by outside stakeholders, and more reasoned explanations for the trade-offs made by counsel on behalf of similarly situated parties. In so doing, courts can provide an important failsafe that helps protect the procedural, substantive, and rule-of-law values threatened by aggregate settlements.


Los Angeles Times – 01.11.17

WHEN IT COMES TO POLITICAL DONATIONS IN L.A., WHAT'S LEGAL CAN BE WORSE THAN WHAT'S NOT

At the very least, says Jessica Levinson, Loyola Law School professor and president of the L.A. City Ethics Commission, we can shine a much brighter light on who’s writing checks to whom.“It would be useful to know if a City Council person gets 50% of his or her donations from dentists, or from real estate developers … something that allows people to infer something about the politician,” Levinson said.


Wall Street Journal – 1.10.17

VW IN TALKS TO PLEAD GUILTY IN U.S. EMISSIONS CASE

A guilty plea by Volkswagen would be notable. While criminal investigations of corporations aren’t uncommon, guilty pleas are rare. BP PLC pleaded guilty to charges in 2012 in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill that killed 11 people, and in 2014 Credit Suisse pleaded guilty to conspiracy for helping U.S. taxpayers hide offshore accounts from the Internal Revenue Service. In 2015, five banks, including Citigroup Inc. and J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., pleaded guilty to charges related to a currency-rigging investigation. “There is a stigma that comes with a criminal conviction,” said Laurie Levenson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.


The Arizona Republic - 01.08.17

CASHIER’S CHECKS, $3,000 IN CASH, A CONSULTANT AND A PASTOR

Jessica Levinson, who teaches elections law at Loyola Law School and leads the Los Angeles Ethics Commission, said the situation involves several unusual variables. She said a spike in giving from an unlikely group of donors who contribute in unconventional ways like cashier's checks or cash should prompt questions from elections officials.“This is not a normal set of circumstances,” Levinson said. “I think that the public is entitled to having these questions answered.”


Crux Now – 01.08.17

CHURCH’S HISTORY OF DEFENDING IMMIGRANTS MUST CONTINUE

For the members of Dolores Mission Parish, they’re not waiting idly by until the system is fixed to meet the needs of their community. Along with nearby Loyola Law School, they helped launch the Loyola Immigrant Justice Clinic, which provides free and low cost legal help to immigrants at their parish.


KCBS-TV – 01.08.17

ANALYZING TRUMP TRANSITION: POLITICAL EXPERT DISCUSSES ACCUSATIONS OF RUSSIAN HACKING

Professor Jessica Levinson of Loyola Law School discusses the future of the DNC and other hot topics.

The American public should be assured that people taking these very important offices, like Secretary of State and Secretary of Defense that these are people who will just be serving the American public. They aren't potentially servicing won’t be servants with two masters; they won't be potentially trying to fill their own pockets at the same time.


La Opinion – 01.07.17

MEXICAN SENATORS PROPOSE ALTERNATIVES FOR DREAMERS AND THEIR FAMILIES

El viernes por la tarde García participó junto a un grupo de “Dreamers” en una conversación en la que senadores mexicanos presentaron una propuesta para abrirles las puertas en México. La reunión se llevó a cabo en la universidad Loyola Law School en el centro de Los Ángeles donde participaron alrededor de 50 jóvenes y algunos padres de familia.


La Gente – 01.07.17

SENATORS PROPOSE ALTERNATIVES FOR DREAMERS AND THEIR FAMILIES

El viernes por la tarde García participó junto a un grupo de “Dreamers” en una conversación en la que senadores mexicanos presentaron una propuesta para abrirles las puertas en México. La reunión se llevó a cabo en la universidad Loyola Law School en el centro de Los Ángeles donde participaron alrededor de 50 jóvenes y algunos padres de familia.


CrimProfBlog – 01.07.17

TOP-TEN RECENT SSRN DOWNLOADS IN CRIMINAL PROCEDURE EJOURNAL

Professor Eric Miller’s “Encountering Resistance: Contesting Policing and Procedural Justice” ranks number 10 in most SSRN Criminal Law & Procedure eJournals downloads.


Visalia Times-Delta – 01.06.17

TULARE COUNTY INMATES MAKE UP 2% OF DEATH ROW

Prosecuting a death penalty case is costly. A study done by Loyola Law Review found that capital cases cost between 10 and 20 times as much as a life-without-parole case. The study also found that on average, the least expensive death penalty trial costs $1.1 million more than the most expensive life-without-parole case.


The Week – 01.07.17

THE BATTLE OVER VOTER ID

A 2014 study by Loyola Law School in Los Angeles unearthed only 31 instances of voter impersonation among the more than 1 billion ballots cast in all U.S. elections since 2000. Richard Hasen, an election-law expert at the University of California, Irvine, says that data from this and previous elections show that Trump's claim of millions of illegal votes is "obscenely ludicrous."


KPCC-FM – 01.04.16

ERIC HOLDER HIRED TO HELP CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE DEAL WITH TRUMP

Professor Laurie Levenson speaks to KPCC regarding California Legislature hiring former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder as outside legal counsel to help navigate any potential conflicts with the incoming Trump administration.


The CLS Blue Sky Blog – 01.04.17

REGULATORY ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Professor Elizabeth Pollman writes on how entrepreneurs are changing the law as part of their business plans.

In their quest to change the law, regulatory entrepreneurs have sometimes used conventional lobbying methods.  However, they have become better known for more creative techniques:  They break the law and take advantage of legal gray areas, asking forgiveness instead of permission.  They seek to grow “too big to ban” before regulators can act.  And, perhaps most striking, they mobilize their users and stakeholders as a political force and use them as leverage to win the change they want from politicians and regulators.


KPCC-FM – 01.03.16

HOUSE REPUBLICANS MOVE TO GUT OFFICE OF CONGRESSIONAL ETHICS – THEN REVERSE COURSE

Professor Jessica Levinson joins AirTalk to discuss House Republicans voted to take away the independence of the Office of Congressional Ethics and their quick reversal of the plan.


Business Law Prof Blog – 01.02.16

THE SALMAN CASE AND THE FUTURE OF INSIDER TRADING by Joan MacLeod Heminway

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/business_law/2017/01/the-salman-case-and-the-future-of-insider-trading.html

Michael D. Guttentag, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, will be one of several professors participating in "Salman v. United States and the Future of Insider Trading Law" at the 2017 AALS Conference.


KABC-AM – 01.02.16

REPUBLICAN’S WENT OUT OF THEIR WAY TO SLOW JUDICIAL NOMINEES by KABC

http://mms.tveyes.com/Transcript.asp?StationID=6450&DateTime=1%2F2%2F2017+11%3A31%3A48+AM&Term=Loyola+Law+School&PlayClip=TRUE

Professor Jessica Levinson discusses obstructionist policies.

We’re in a place where the founding fathers worried we would ultimately get which is a place of factionalism where the government can’t function. And people aren’t looking for what’s best for the country they’re looking at what’s best for a small group, what’s best for the party.