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May 2017

 

Los Angeles Daily Journal - 05.31.17

HOW IMMIGRATION CONSEQUENCES AFFECT A PLEA DEPENDS ON THE STATE 

"I would challenge those assumptions. We have not seen, by and large, these kinds of softballing or reduction in criminal conviction based on immigration status," said Emily Robinson of the Loyola Law School Immigrant Justice Clinic, who disagreed with concerns that immigration status leads to milder dispositions. "I would challenge people who say that to consider we don't know what kind of evidence they had, and whether they could meet the burden of proof."


Kheiro Magazine – 05.31.17

NATIONAL REDISTRICTING EXPERT PROVIDES OVERVIEW OF RECENT SCOTUS GERRYMANDER DECISION, PREVIEW OF WHAT’S TO COME

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Justin Levitt discussed the Supreme Court’s recent opinion in a North Carolina redistricting case with alumna Janna Brancolini ’14.

Most states have rules that say district map drawers should follow county lines or other political boundaries when they can. Districts have to be roughly compact, so they have to keep people who live closer together roughly within in the same district. They usually have to be contiguous; you can’t have territory in between districts. But in most states those are guidelines more than mandates.


KCAL-TV – 05.30.17

GRIFFIN SPARKS OUTRAGE 

Professor Jessica Levinson of Loyola Law School, Los Angeles discusses Kathy Griffin’s controversial photo shoot inspired by Donald Trump.

“I ultimately don't think she will face any charges. I think we're entitled to broad latitude when it comes to the first amendment. We’re entitled to a lot of discretion when it comes to artistic expression, which is exactly as it should be.”


KNX-1070 AM – 05.30.17

UC REGENTS CHANGE COURSE 

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson weighs in on the University of California deciding to no longer pay for its governing board members’ dinners and parties.

“You could always help some students along if you say, ‘You know what, instead of spending this money, let’s try to give a small scholarship to a few students.’ It just looks terrible.” 


Orange County Bar Association – 05.31.17

THREE OCBA MEMBERS HONORED BY LOYOLA LAW SCHOOL 

Loyola Law School honored OCBA members Hon. Gail Andler (Ret.), Hon. Richard Pacheco, and Hon. Lawrence Yellin with this year's Distinguished Orange County Alumni Award. The award was presented at the Orange County Alumni Reception held on May 4, 2017, at the Newport Beach Country Club in Newport Beach.


CNN – 05.30.17

SUPREME COURT'S NEXT STEP ON GERRYMANDERING COULD BE ITS BIGGEST YET 

"The court has said that too much partisanship is illegal," said Justin Levitt, a professor of law at Loyola Law School. "But it hasn't yet decided how much is too much."


Los Angeles Times – 05.30.17

HUNTINGTON PARK COUNCILWOMAN'S FUNDRAISING BUSINESS IS A TEST OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST LAWS

Jessica Levinson, a government ethics professor at Loyola Law School, said such a precedent might encourage ill-disposed politicians in places where fewer people are paying attention. That would include relatively small cities and scores of often obscure agencies that make up the patchwork of governments in places like L.A.


San Francisco Gate – 05.29.17

UC REVERSES POLICY, WON’T PICK UP TAB FOR REGENTS’ Parties

Jessica Levinson, a law professor and government ethics expert at Loyola Law School, said invoicing the dinners to UC was “distasteful” and “tone deaf,” but at least university officials were swiftly responsive to public pressure.“We’re talking about money that could be used to educate kids,” Levinson said. “If they wanted to have reasonable business dinners, maybe that’s a different story, but that doesn’t appear to be what happened.”


Times Standard – 05.29.17

YOU AND THE LAW: KINGS COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT HAS A PROBLEM

Loyola Law School (Los Angeles) Professor Bryan Hull observes, “It isn’t practical to expect that consumers will know that they have a right to a written estimate. They will unwittingly pay the bill, and only find out later that there was a right to a written estimate. This judge’s decision undermines the whole point of the law.”


The New Orleans Advocate  - 05.28.17

DECISION TO SCRAP OLD MURDER CONVICTION PUTS ORLEANS DA LEON CANNIZZARO ON THE HOT SEAT IN FEDERAL LAWSUIT

Laurie Levenson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles who was hired by Adams' attorneys, cited at least two dozen cases from the Connick era involving documented violations of Brady v. Maryland, the 1963 Supreme Court ruling that said prosecutors must disclose all exculpatory evidence to the defense.


Variety – 05.26.17

FYRE FESTIVAL LAWSUITS ADVANCE ON DUAL CIVIL, CRIMINAL TRACKS

Adam Zimmerman, a Loyola Law School professor specializing in complex civil litigation, said the fact that a criminal investigation is in progress would be enough to allow the defense to move for a stay, it is not necessary that they be formally indicted. But Zimmerman said he believes it likely the judicial council will still allow the civil class actions to move forward and be consolidated. “A pending indictment wouldn’t really impact the question of whether the civil cases warrant a transfer. Once the cases are transferred to a single federal judge — and I would think the facts favor transfer — that judge could decide to stay the proceedings pending the outcome of the criminal case. That is not uncommon.”


KCBS-LA – 05.25.17

FUTURE OF THE TRAVEL BAN

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson discusses the future of the travel ban following the Fourth Circuit ruling to uphold the block of the travel ban.

It’s possible, unfortunately, that we could see a partisan vote at the Supreme Court...My hope is that Supreme Court doesn’t make a partisan decision and that it looks at all of the different decisions made, not just by the Fourth Circuit but also the Ninth Circuit and they look at all the Constitutional problems of the travel ban.


Huffington Post – 05.24.17

SUPREME COURT PUTS STATES ON NOTICE ABOUT USING RACE IN REDISTRICTING 

The court is sending a clear signal that states needed to “be careful” and “do their homework” when using race as a factor in drawing district boundaries, said Justin Levitt, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles who served as deputy assistant attorney general in the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division from 2015 to 2017.


Associated Press – 05.25.17

CULTURE CRITIC: COSBY SEEKING NEW SOLIDARITY WITH BLACKS

Loyola Law School Professor Laurie Levenson wonders if Cosby is trying to signal to blacks on the jury with his recent comments, by sending the message "that you have a mission on this jury, to make sure he's not treated as a black man who's come on aggressively to white women."


NPR – 05.25.17

HOW ELECTIONS INFLUENCE JUDGES

Research by scholars at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles and the Toulouse School of Economics in France suggest judges in U.S. circuit courts appear to be affected by the rhetoric of political campaigns. Now, judges are nominated by presidents, so they're often seen as being liberal or conservative. But in a new analysis of 18,686 rulings over 77 years, Carlos Berdejo and Daniel Chen find that judges appointed by both Republican and Democratic presidents become sharply more partisan right before a presidential election.


Associated Press – 05.24.17

DEFENSE RAISES RACE BIAS IN COSBY JURY SELECTION PROCESS

"Race plays a role in every trial, but it shouldn't eclipse ... the evidence," Loyola Law School Professor Laurie Levenson said. "This case is frankly more about gender, celebrity, how women are treated (and) Bill Cosby's credibility. But race may take a more focused perspective because the defense has (raised it) recently."


Associated Press – 05.23.17

THE LATEST: BILL COSBY ARRIVES FOR DAY 2 OF JURY SELECTION

"Can we trust them (to be fair)? That's really the question," said Laurie Levenson, a Loyola Law School professor. "Sometimes it's not so easy. It's one thing to set aside intellectually what you know, but it's another to set it aside emotionally."


Vibe – 05.23.17

O.J. ‘THE JUICE’ SIMPSON MAY SQUEEZE HIS WAY TO PAROLE THIS SUMMER

According to Laurie Levenson, a Loyola Law School professor, it’s possible that Simpson will be granted parole at his pending July hearing because “previously, they have ranked him as low-risk.” He was denied parole in 2013, and if denied again in July, his next chance will be in 2020 when he is 73 years old.


Azteca Trece – 05.22.17

USTED, DISCULPE

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Project for the Innocent (LPI) client Jaime Ponce, who was ordered release in April, is profiled in a Spanish-language news segment.


KCRW-FM – 05.22.17

WHY DOJ IS TRYING TO STOP LAWYERS FROM REPRESENTING IMMIGRANTS IN SEATTLE

Joining us to talk about this case is a familiar voice on Press Play, Jessica Levinson, a law professor at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, and she will be joining us every Monday to talk about law stuff.”


Variety – 05.22.17

IS FYRE FESTIVAL FOUNDER BILLY MCFARLAND FACING PRISON TIME?

“The longer they wait, the greater the chance of the money disappearing, and the harder it is to trace,” says Laurie Levenson, who spent eight years as an assistant U.S. attorney and now teaches at Loyola Law School. “Who has control of those festival millions, what have they been doing with it and why? In order to bring criminal charges, this is key,” she says.


Vox – 05.22.17

THE SUPREME COURT’S BIG RACIAL GERRYMANDERING DECISION, EXPLAINED

“The big takeaway for legislators is you have to do your homework,” Loyola Law School Professor Justin Levitt, who worked on an amicus brief in favor of the North Carolina plaintiffs while he was at the US Department of Justice, said. “You got to actually put in the time to figure out where there are real responsibilities under the Voting Rights Act — and there will be real responsibilities under the Voting Rights Act. Where there are, you have to consider race to draw appropriate districts. Where there aren’t, you can’t just throw people into a district based on their race willy-nilly.”


Jefferson Public Radio – 05.22.17

MORE THAN 10 YEARS AFTER ALLEGED SEXUAL ASSAULT, BILL COSBY TRIAL TO BEGIN 

The second accuser's story is critical, says Laurie Levenson, law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "What they're going to focus on is that this was a signature crime, that Cosby had a particular way of drugging his victims and then having sex with him," Levenson said. "So even the testimony of one person, one additional person, is enough."


Pasadena Now – 05.21.17

UNION STATION HOMELESS SERVICES WELCOMES 10 NEW BOARD MEMBERS

Union Station Homeless Services is proud to announce 10 additions to their board of directors. Arnold Siegel is an emeritus Loyola Law School professor. A long-time Union Station supporter, he has previously served on the board (including a term as board chair).


NJ.com – 05.20.17

TRUMP'S VOTER FRAUD COMMISSION IS A FRAUD | EDITORIAL

Another comprehensive study from Loyola Law School (Calif.) found 31 credible instances of fraud from 2000 to 2014 out of more than 1 billion ballots cast.


FindLaw – 05.19.17

SHOULD JURORS BE REMOVED FOR CRYING

Crying alone may not be juror misconduct. But there are circumstances where a juror's emotions may result in an unfair trial. Laurie Levenson, professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, said it has been a difficult problem for courts to sort out. "Preventing and remedying juror misconduct is one of the biggest challenges the criminal justice system faces today," she wrote for the National Law Journal.


The Sentinel – 05.19.17

MISLEADING RESTAURANT MENU DESCRIPTIONS

“Looking at this from strictly a contract law perspective,” Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Contracts Professor Bryan Hull commented, “If the only descriptions on the menu were ‘T-Steak Burger’ and ‘Vegetable Soup,’ there would be an issue as to what a reasonable consumer would expect.”


Los Angeles Daily Journal – 05.19.17

WEEKLY APPELLATE REPORT PODCAST

I’ll speak with Professor Adam Zimmerman, from Loyola Law School, about the U.S. Supreme Court arbitration ruling rendered Monday, which strikes down a Kentucky Supreme Court ruling that the country's high court deemed to have discriminated against and subordinated arbitration as a means of dispute resolution, in contravention of the Federal Arbitration Act. While some legal analysts view the ruling as no more than a reaffirmation of SCOTUS' pro-arbitration stance, reiterated vigorously of late, Professor Zimmerman explains why this case might actually expand, slightly but meaningfully, the Court's endorsement of the alternate method of dispute resolution.


CGTN America – 05.18.17

FORMER FBI DIRECTOR ROBERT MUELLER TO INVESTIGATE TRUMP’S TIES TO RUSSIA

“He’s known as being very thorough, searching, detail-orientated. It’s seen that he can add an independent voice to this investigation which is exactly what’s needed now,” Said Jessica Levinson, a law professor at Loyola.


The Mercury News – 05.17.17

SAN JOSE: COUNCIL RECOMMENDS ALLOWING LEGAL FUNDS TO PAY CAMPAIGN-RELATED FINES

“I think it means San Jose won’t be an outlier, though they can be stricter than what the state allows,” said Jessica Levinson, a professor at Loyola Law School and president of the Los Angeles Ethics Commission. “This is more generous for office holders, but it raises the question about whether fees will really be a deterrent. It may be legal, but now officials won’t feel the pinch of any penalties because they can just raise money.”


San Francisco Chronicle – 05.18.17

TRUMP SLAMS PROBE INTO HIM AS ‘SINGLE GREATEST WITCH HUNT’

Jessica Levinson, a law professor at Loyola Law School, said: “You can start a special investigation that’s more narrow and the further you go, the more people you talk to, and the more documents you obtain, then it becomes broader. “And I think that may be the fear of many in the administration tonight, that it’s not confined, and that it actually is like an octopus and that there are a lot of arms and tentacles.”


SCOTUSBlog – 05.17.17

WEDNESDAY ROUND-UP

At Loyola Law School’s Summary Judgments blog, Adam Zimmerman looks at Kindred Nursing Centers Limited Partnership v. Clark, in which the court ruled on Monday that a power of attorney does not need to address arbitration specifically before an agent can bind her principal to an arbitration agreement, calling the decision “a clear sign that the Supreme Court’s will continue to stand by arbitration contracts that stop private parties from enforcing state law in state courts.”


Reuters – 05.17.17

FACTBOX: U.S. JUSTICE DEPARTMENT'S SPECIAL COUNSEL PROBE OF RUSSIA

The department regulations are "not quite as robust" as a law related to the appointment of a special prosecutor that lapsed in the 1990s, according to Justin Levitt, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.


KCAL-TV – 05.17.17

JUSTICE DEPARTMENT APPOINTS SPECIAL COUNSEL IN RUSSIA INQUIRY

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson explains the power of the recently appointed special counsel in the inquiry into Russian entanglement with the White House and the 2016 presidential election.


Summary Judgements – 05.17.17

PROFESSOR CAPLAN PENS ACLU AMICUS BRIEF

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Aaron Caplan was the primary author of an amicus brief submitted to the California Court of Appeal in Geoffrey C. Keyes v. Jan Brio. The case interprets the California civil harassment statute, a topic on which Caplan has a leading law review article. In the brief, Caplan focuses on whether the speech in question is “directed at a specific person” or is merely about that person. 


KTLA-TV – 05.16.17

‘CREEPY’ LETTER TO LOS ANGELES VOTERS SHOWS NEIGHBORS’ VOTING RECORDS 

But commission President Jessica Levinson said the letter was like a "high school cafeteria approach to getting people to vote." "Overall I think it's enormously dispiriting to try to shame people into voting," Levinson said. "Clearly voter turnout is a huge problem in our city ... but it's terribly depressing that we think the only way to get people to weigh in on their representatives and proposed laws is to publicly embarrass them."


Associated Press – 05.16.17

CALIFORNIA OVERSIGHT AGENCY FINES GOVERNOR'S AIDE, CAMPAIGN 

Fines issued by the commission can be seen by officials and candidates as the "cost of doing business," especially if they're not particularly large, said Jessica Levinson, a professor and government ethics expert at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.


Los Angeles Times – 05.15.17

WAS TRUMP'S TRAVEL BAN TARGETED AT MUSLIMS? A FEDERAL APPEALS COURT ZEROES IN ON THE DEBATE

"It looked like Paez was looking to make a broader decision [against the travel ban] and maybe Hawkins and Gould were looking into a narrower decision,” said Loyola Law School Professor Jessica Levinson. “But it's difficult to predict."


KCRW – 05.15.17

TRUMP'S TRAVEL BAN GOES TO 9TH CIRCUIT COURT

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson discusses the issues facing the Trump travel ban in oral arguments before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.


The Arizona Republic – 5.15.17

MONTINI: REVEALING - IN 2 WORDS - HOW TRUMP’S VOTER FRAUD COMMISSION IS A FRAUD

In 2014, Justin Levitt, a professor at the Loyola Law School, a constitutional law scholar and a number-crunching watchdog, described the “problem” for The Washington Post.


San Francisco Chronicle– 5.14.17

FEINSTEIN, HARRIS GAIN FRESH FOCUS IN WAKE OF COMEY’S OUSTER

So far, both Feinstein and Harris have responded in ways that are “emblematic of their different personalities,” said Jessica Levinson, a professor of law at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. Both are calling for a special counsel to investigate the Russian meddling, but Feinstein “had a more pragmatic, less emotional response,” she said, while Harris appears “very comfortable positioning herself as one of the leaders of the anti-Trump movement.”


Los Angeles Times – 5.14.17

MEET THE MALIBU LAWYER WHO IS UPENDING CALIFORNIA'S POLITICAL SYSTEM, ONE TOWN AT A TIME

He contacted three voting-rights experts — constitutional law professor Justin Levitt of Loyola Law school, Cal Tech history professor Morgan Kousser and demographer David Ely — who helped him figure out how to approach the case, and then brought in two experienced trial lawyers, R. Rex Parris (who happens to be the mayor of Lancaster) and Milton Grimes, perhaps best-known as the late Rodney King’s attorney.


KNBC-TV- 5.14.17

NEWSCONFERENCE L.A.'S MAY 16 MUNICIPAL ELECTION REVIEW

A quick review of Tuesday’s municipal election in Los Angeles with Loyola Law School’s Jessica Levinsonand host Conan Nolan.


KSDK-TV – 5.12.17

MAN REUNITED WITH MOTHER AFTER BEING WRONGFULLY CONVICTED FOR 32 YEARS

The Loyola Law School Project for the Innocent raised concerns about Wilson’s original case. And on March 16, Wilson emerged a free man. “It's two victories: I’m home and the truth came to the light."


San Francisco Chronicle – 5.12.17

SESSIONS ORDERS FEDERAL PROSECUTORS TO SEEK MAX PENALTIES 

Sessions is sending a message that “we’re going to be the tougher, harsher Justice Department on drug crimes,” but “there’s a big question mark on what the practical impact will be,” said Laurie Levenson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles and a former federal prosecutor.


Pasion Noticias – 05.12.17

TRUMP DEFENDS FIRING OF FBI DIRECTOR, PLEDGES 'FAR BETTER' REPLACEMENT

If the Attorney-General ignores the recommendations of a special counsel, the rules specify that a report must be sent to Congress, according to Justin Levitt, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.


Los Angeles Daily Journal – 05.11.17

MODIFICATIONS TO PROPOSED PROSECUTOR RULE WILL HAVE CONSEQUENCES

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Laurie Levenson pens op-ed on ABA Model Rule 3.8 and special duties of prosecutors.

Prosecutors, individuals accused of crimes, and the entire state of California would be better served by firmly establishing a culture that clearly requires the disclosure of all exculpatory evidence and information, whether or not it is material, significant, or only discredits evidence the prosecutor affirmatively intends to present at trial.


Vox – 05.11.17

TRUMP WANTS THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO START INVESTIGATING IMAGINARY VOTER FRAUD

Loyola Law School professor Justin Levitt studied voter impersonation, the type of fraud that strict voter ID laws (which Trump supports) aim to curtail. Levitt found 35 total credible accusations between 2000 and 2014, constituting a few hundred ballots at most. During this 14-year period, more than 800 million ballots were cast in national general elections and hundreds of millions more were cast in primary, municipal, special, and other elections.


The Hill – 05.10.17

TRUMP'S RELIGIOUS FREEDOM ORDER NO MORE THAN A SYMBOLIC STATEMENT

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Ellen Aprill’s op-ed explains that Trump's religious freedom order no more than a symbolic statement.

As President Trump’s executive order acknowledges, it does not change applicable law. It does not change the status quo. As far as the tax law is concerned, it is no more than a symbolic statement. It may, however, suggest actions to come.


The Hollywood Reporter – 05.10.17

JOHNNY DEPP: A STAR IN CRISIS AND THE INSANE STORY OF HIS "MISSING" MILLIONS

"I don't think a commission agreement is enforceable without writing," says Jay Dougherty, director of Loyola Law School's Entertainment & Media Law Institute. "Without a written agreement, I think the client can back out of the deal."


KQED-FM – 05.09.17

FEINSTEIN, HARRIS REACTIONS TO COMEY FIRING A STUDY IN CONTRASTS

“What we see is somebody who’s not going to run for higher office again and somebody who wants to run for president,” said Loyola Law School professor Jessica Levinson. On Feinstein, Levinson said: “We see someone who’s winding down her career and may have to wind down because she’s been so unemotional about things people want to see her fired up about.”


KCRW-FM – 05.09.17

WHY WAS FBI DIRECTOR JAMES COMEY FIRED?

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Justin Levitt speaks on Press Play with Madeleine Brand on James Comey’s firing.


Associated Press – 05.05.17

STUDENTS SUSPENDED FOR "LIKING" RACIST INSTAGRAM POSTS SUE SCHOOL

But courts have disagreed about whether schools can punish students for off-campus speech that causes disruptions at school - a more likely scenario these days with the reach of social media - said Aaron Caplan, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "In my own view, students are entitled to speak just like everyone else when they are off campus," Caplan said. "The school should not say, 'You engaged in free speech over the weekend on your own time, but we will punish you because your speech has ripple effects that we don't like.'"


Huffington Post – 05.05.17

IOWA REPUBLICANS JUST MADE IT HARDER TO VOTE — FOR NO REASON

There is no evidence that widespread voter fraud is a problem. From 2000 until 2014, there were just 31 credible incidences of voter impersonation ― the kind of voter fraud that voter ID laws would prevent, according to Justin Levitt, a professor at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles. In North Carolina, an audit of the 2016 election found just one case of in-person voter impersonation at the polls out of 4.8 million votes cast. Prosecutors in the case declined to bring charges.


San Gabriel Valley Tribune – 05.04.17

HERE’S ALL OF THE GUNS THE ATF TOOK FROM PASADENA POLICE LIEUTENANT’S SIERRA MADRE HOME

Loyola Law School professor Laurie Levenson said that besides educating the police community, the notice would likely serve another purpose. “They’re looking for whether they can show intent to violate or circumvent the law,” Levenson said. “Once you put out the warning, it will be much easier to prove that.”


Concurring Opinions – 05.03.17

FAN 150 (FIRST AMENDMENT NEWS) TREND ENDS: ACLU’S 2017 ACTION PLAN STANDS “UP FOR FREE SPEECH”

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jennifer Rothman to speak on “Right of Publicity” at Commercial Speech & The First Amendment: Creeping Commercial Speech hosted by the Floyd Abrams Institute for Freedom of Expression at Yale law School.


Buzzfeed – 05.03.17

THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT UNDER TRUMP IS FIGHTING TO KEEP RECORDS ABOUT HILLARY CLINTON SECRET

Aaron Caplan, a FOIA expert and professor at Loyola Law School, said in an email to BuzzFeed News that DOJ’s position in these cases may also be driven by a desire to “maximize governmental privacy,” even if it aligns the Trump administration with the interests of the president’s former opponent; chants of “lock her up” at Trump rallies last year were rooted in Trump’s criticism of Clinton for using a private email server.


Vimeo Channel – 05.03.17

EXONERATING THE WRONGFULLY CONVICTED,” LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERVISOR MARK RIDLEY-THOMAS

Board of Supervisors chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas presented a scroll honoring Loyola Law School’s Project for the Innocent (LPI) for their work in exonerating the wrongly convicted. “The criminal justice system can only function if it is fair, just and protects the innocent,” Board Chair Ridley-Thomas said. “Unfortunately, sometimes the system gets it wrong and it is often people of color who bear the brunt of these wrongful convictions.


The International Jurist, May 2017

BEST LLM PROGRAMS

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles’ Master of Laws (LLM) program receives an A grade for Academics and Best Law School Experience.


San Francisco Chronicle – 05.02.17

PROSECUTORS TO FACE PUNISHMENT FOR WITHHOLDING EVIDENCE 

“I was very relieved to see that the court maintained what I thought were the most crucial parts of the revision,” said Laurie Levenson, a Loyola Law School professor and former federal prosecutor.


The Sacramento Bee – 05.02.17

HERE’S HOW DONALD TRUMP’S ATTORNEY GENERAL COULD CHANGE LIFE IN CALIFORNIA

Sessions’ approach represents “a complete reversal” of the Obama administration, said Laurie Levenson, a professor at Loyola Law School and former assistant U.S. attorney. “That’s the way Trump and Sessions want it to be,” Levenson said. “But California is not going silently into the night.”


The Recorder – 05.02.17

HOW LAWYER-NEGOTIATORS AVERTED HOLLYWOOD WRITERS' STRIKE

Across the table, key roles were played by WGA East Executive Director Lowell Peterson, a former partner at New York’s Meyer, Suozi, English & Klein, and Patric Verrone, a lecturer at Loyola Law School who saw the union through the 2007 writers' strike.


Hyperallergic – 05.01.17

THE HAMMER MUSEUM EXAMINES THE LEGACY OF THE LA UPRISING

The panel discussion To Protect and Serve on Wednesday, May 3, will examine police reforms in the two and a half decades since King’s beating, with civil rights attorney Connie Rice, New Mexico state police officer Anwar Sanders, and UCLA law professors Devon Carbado and Beth Colgan, Arif Alikhan, Director of the LAPD Office of Constitutional Policing and Policy, and Priscilla Ocen, Associate Professor of Law at Loyola Law School. On the evening of Thursday, May 4, the concluding event will be a screening of Do Not Resist, a recent film focusing on the militarization of police forces throughout the US, followed by a discussion with Black Lives Matter cofounder Patrisse Cullors.