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June 2017

 

CNN – 06.30.17

PENCE-KOBACH VOTING COMMISSION ALARMS STATES WITH INFO REQUEST

Civil rights and voting rights advocates were also concerned. Loyola Law School professor Justin Levitt, a former Obama Justice Department official, blasted the request from Kobach as "massively irresponsible" and questioned whether it might run afoul of certain laws, in a post on the legal blog Take Care.


The Washington Post – 06.30.17

HOW TRUMP’S NATIONWIDE VOTER DATA REQUEST COULD LEAD TO VOTER SUPPRESSION

An expansion of the Crosscheck system would be "a recipe for massive amounts of error," according to elections expert Justin Levitt of Loyola Law School. "When you've got hundreds of millions of records, and thousands of John Smiths, trying to figure out which of them are your John Smith without making a mistake is well nigh impossible." 


Vox – 06.30.17

TRUMP’S ‘ELECTION INTEGRITY’ COMMISSION WANTS EVERY VOTER’S NAME, PARTY ID AND ADDRESS

Loyola Law School Professor Justin Levitt studied voter impersonation, the type of fraud that strict voter ID laws (which Trump supports) aim to curtail. Levitt found 35 total credible accusations between 2000 and 2014, constituting a few hundred ballots at most. During this 14-year period, more than 800 million ballots were cast in national general elections and hundreds of millions more were cast in primary, municipal, special, and other elections.


Take Care – 06.30.17

ALL YOUR VOTER DATA BELONG TO US

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Justin Levitt analyzes Kris Kobach’s request for voter information in order to build a national voter file.

Kris Kobach just asked for help building a national voter file in two weeks. That’s massively irresponsible. And it might well be illegal.


Los Angeles Times – 06.29.17

AS TRAVEL BAN GOES INTO EFFECT, DEBATE ENSUES OVER WHO COUNTS AS 'CLOSE' FAMILY, AND HAWAII FILES A COURT CHALLENGE

But Kevin Lapp, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, said the closest that law comes to defining "close family" is a section that describes "immediate relatives" as children younger than 21, spouses and parents. Those relatives get preference for visas, and the government went beyond that definition with the travel ban rules, he said.


Ventura County Star – 06.29.17

JUDGE SHORTAGE DELAYS JUSTICE IN VENTURA COUNTY, STATE

Since criminal cases have constitutional mandates and often take precedent, civil cases and others in small claims or family courts also could be further delayed, said Laurie Levenson, professor of law at Loyola Law School..."Meanwhile, judges often feel like it's an assembly line ... and you don't want your case, whether you are the defendant or the victim, to feel like it's part of that assembly line," Levenson said. "It's very frustrating for the judges because they are, by and large, very dedicated.


San Francisco Chronicle – 06.29.17

CALIFORNIA OFFICIAL BRISTLES AT TRUMP VOTER FRAUD PANEL’S RECORDS REQUEST

Given Kobach’s record as an election rights hard-liner and Trump’s oft-stated conviction that voter fraud cost him the popular vote, there are real questions about just how independent and unbiased the commission’s investigation will be, said Jessica Levinson, an election law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. “What’s the reason for getting this information?” she said. “This is a fishing expedition to find something that will allow the federal government to implement laws that shouldn’t be implemented.”


Ken Rudin's Political Junkie – 06.29.17

EPISODE #185: A CLEAN BILL OF HEALTH CARE?

Partisan redistricting will be on the Court’s agenda next fall. Justin Levitt of Loyola Law School tells us about the case and what to expect.


LMU Magazine – Summer 2017

A CONVERSATION WITH MARISSA MONTES LLS ’12 AND EMILY ROBINSON LLS ’12

Marissa Montes ’12 and Emily Robinson ’12 are co-directors of Loyola Immigrant Justice Clinic, which they founded in 2012 at Loyola Law School. LIJC provides free consultations and legal services and education twice a week to the immigrant community of Los Angeles at Homeboy Industries and Dolores Mission Catholic Church, as well as real-world experience in immigration law to Loyola Law School students. We spoke to them about recent developments in immigration issues in Los Angeles.


Los Angeles Times – 06.29.17

STATE TO PAY $2.9 MILLION TO THREE MEN WRONGFULLY CONVICTED IN LOS ANGELES CASES

The largest payment — $1.7 million — goes to Kash Delano Register, who said he was wrongfully convicted of a 1979 murder because of a flawed LAPD investigation….The court acted after lawyers and students from Loyola Law School cast doubt on the testimony of a key prosecution witness.


KPCC-FM – 06.28.17

DO JUDGE RECALLS REALLY WORK?

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Laurie Levenson discusses what it takes to get an elected judge off the bench.

Judge recalls are very uncommon...The reason they are so unusual is that ordinarily the controversy will die down...even if people don’t like a judge's decision, they respect the independence of the judge to make that decision. Most recalls never happen.


Miami Herald -06.27.17

CLAIM REPEATED ON ‘FOX AND FRIENDS’ THAT 5.7 MILLION NONCITIZENS VOTED IS WRONG

We interviewed other election experts: Rick Hasen, an election law expert at the University of California, Irvine; Lorraine Minnite, political science professor at Rutgers University; and Justin Levitt, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles who has tracked voter fraud allegations since 2000. All three rejected Agresti’s conclusions.


Vice News – 06.27.17

THE REAL VOTER FRAUD

That researcher, Loyola Law School Professor Justin Levitt — whose investigation found that statistic that only one ballot in about 32 million will involve voter impersonation — wrote in the Washington Post in 2014, “Requirements to show ID at the polls are designed for pretty much one thing: people showing up at the polls pretending to be somebody else in order to each cast one incremental fake ballot. This is a slow, clunky way to steal an election. Which is why it rarely happens.”


LA Talk Radio – 06.26.17

THE LAW AND OUR CURRENT CLIMATE

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Kimberly West-Faulcon discusses Trump’s travel ban, its constitutional defects and Loyola students’ heightened interest in the legal issues dominating the headlines on “Table for 5” with Annette Ortiz Mata and Felicia Grigsby.  “I find that my students are highly engaged, and at this particular moment, they’re more engaged than ever.”


Columbia Journalism Review – 06.26.17

MEDIA OPPOSE RIGHT-OF-PUBLICITY BILL: ‘AN ATTACK ON THE FIRST AMENDMENT

Here are a few examples from the assembly bill, which was rushed through the legislature without much discussion before it was pulled. Many of these were noted in a memo written by Jennifer Rothman, an intellectual property scholar at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, who opposed the bill.


KCRW-FM – 06.26.17

SUPREME COURT WILL HEAR CASES ON RELIGIOUS FREEDOM AND TRUMP'S TRAVEL BAN

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson discusses this week’s Supreme Court activity, including recent grants of review in cases involving Trump’s so-called travel ban a Colorado baker who refused to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple, as well as its opinion in favor of a Missouri church seeking public funds for improvements.


KCBS-TV – 06.26.17

SUPREME COURT DECIDES TO TAKE UP TRAVEL BAN CASE

Professor Jessica Levinson of Loyola Law School, Los Angeles assesses the implications of the U.S. Supreme Court agreeing to review challenges to Trump’s travel ban.

If it sounds like it lacks some clarity that because it does. The three conservative members of the court who dissented from the decisions said that’s just an unworkable standard. If there is one thing that is sure, as a result of the court's order there will be litigation between now and, at least, October when the Court hears the decision.


KTTV-TV (Fox 11) – 06.26.17

GOOD DAY LA

Professor Jessica Levinson of Loyola Law School, Los Angeles appears on “Good Day LA” to discuss Trump’s travel ban and its impending Supreme Court review.

Essentially, what the court said today is we will hear the case that deals with President Trump’s revised executive order, the revised travel ban...The travel ban can go into effect except yes for some people and not for others and that’s where we’ll see a flood of litigation.


CNN – 06.26.17

TRAVEL BAN, RELIGIOUS LIBERTY CASES COULD KEEP SWING VOTE KENNEDY

"Justice Kennedy is the most powerful jurist in the world," said law professor Jessica Levinson of Loyola Law School. "The longer he stays on the court the greater the chance he can shape the legal doctrine for years to come."

"He was the lone voice at the center holding the courthouse doors open in 2004, and he was the one who specifically asked lawyers to come back with more cases using different standards," said election law expert Justin Levitt, also of Loyola Law School.


KNX 1070-AM – 06.26.17

TRAVEL BAN GOES TO THE SUPREME COURT

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson discusses the Supreme Court’s decision to grant review of travel ban cases.

My guess is that this six-member majority was held together by the fact this was a partial ruling. Yes, the travel ban goes forward with respect to some people, no it doesn’t with respect to others.


KPCC-FM – 06.26.17

SCOTUS DECISION ON TRAVEL BAN & EFFECT ON CALIFORNIA

"They've essentially pushed pause on some of the courts' rulings," said Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Justin Levitt. But "the people without a connection to the U.S. don't have enough to on on to be relieved of the ban until we hear more."


The Ethan Bearman Show – 06.26.17

NEWS FROM THE SUPREME COURT

Loyola Law School, Los AngelesProfessor Justin Levitt provides Supreme Court analysis on The Ethan Bearman Show hosted by Ethan Bearman ’19 in the wake of the high court’s moves on the travel ban, public funding for churches and First Amendment rights for bakers.


LLM Guide – 06.26.17

A FRESH LOOK AT TECHNOLOGY LLMS

Indeed, this is a growing field. Over the past few years a number of law schools have introduced LL.M. programs in technology and related fields. In 2016, Cornell Law School launched an LL.M. in Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship, on its New York City Campus. Other schools, such as NYU and Loyola Law School, have launched specialized programs in Cybersecurity.


Politico – 06.24.17

CALIFORNIA ACTIVIST TOM STEYER ADDS HEALTH CARE TO HIS BRAND

Jessica Levinson, who teaches politics and ethics at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, said Steyer's push into health care makes him a more well-rounded candidate. “He doesn’t want to be known as the environmental guy who spends a lot of money,” she said. 


Politifact – 06.22.17

FOLLOWING TRUMP VOTER FRAUD ALLEGATIONS, CLAIM THAT 5.7 MILLION NONCITIZENS VOTED IS WRONG

We interviewed other election experts: Rick Hasen, an election law expert at the University of California, Irvine; Lorraine Minnite, political science professor at Rutgers University; and Justin Levitt, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles who has tracked voter fraud allegations since 2000. All three rejected Agresti’s conclusions.


The Advocate – 06.22.17

ANGOLA INMATE JOHN FLOYD SET FREE AFTER 36 YEARS PENDING APPEAL ON OVERTURNED MURDER CONVICTION

A recent report by Laurie Levenson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, found at least two dozen cases from the Connick era with documented failures to turn over evidence favorable to a defendant.


Associated Press – 06.22.17

FORMER IMMIGRATION DETAINEES CHALLENGE LABOR PRACTICES (Spanish)

Courts view immigration detention not as punishment but as a way to keep people from fleeing, said Kathleen Kim, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles who specializes in immigration law. Forcing detainees to work violates the 13th Amendment, which ended slavery and bars involuntary servitude except for punishment of a crime, she said.


Consumer Law and Policy Blog – 06.20.17

SCOTUS PERSONAL JURISDICTION CASE LIKELY TO LIMIT NATIONWIDE MASS/CLASS ACTIONS IN STATE COURTS

According to Loyola Law School Professor Adam Zimmerman, we should expect defendants in nationwide or multistate class actions in federal court to cite the Bristol-Myers Squibb decision to try to squelch claims by out-of-state plaintiffs. It may be that class action plaintiffs will be forced to file statewide cases instead of nationwide or even multistate class actions, Zimmerman said.


Los Angeles Times – 06.20.17

IN GERRYMANDER CASE, SUPREME COURT TAKES ON LONG HISTORY OF BRAZEN POLITICAL SELF-DEALING

“Drawing fair districts is a little like drawing a fair tax plan,” said Justin Levitt, a constitutional scholar at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. “A lot of people have very different ideas what those should look like at the end of the day.”


National Center for State Courts – 06.20.17

JOURNALISTS HEAR FROM COURT LEADERS ON FINES, FEES AND BAIL by National Center for State Courts (available upon request)

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Priscilla Ocen moderated the Journalist Law School session, “The Third Branch Confronts Race & Class: Fines, Fees & Bail.” Judges and other top experts populated the panel.

“Holding people in jail simply because they are poor negatively impacts the trajectory of their lives, including increasing the likelihood of recidivism,” Missouri Chief Justice Patricia Breckenridge told a group of national reporters attending the Journalist Law School at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles recently.


New York Times – 06.19.20

GERRYMANDERING CASE ECHOES IN INKBLOT-LIKE DISTRICTS ACROSS THE U.S. 

“The Supreme Court is a pretty big planet, and its gravitational pull is pretty strong,” said Justin Levitt, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles who tracks redistricting cases on his All About Redistricting website. 


Thomson Reuters – 06.19.17

ON THE CASE: CLASS ACTION FALLOUT FROM SCOTUS SPECIFIC JURISDICTION OPINION? (available upon request)

The court said it wasn't addressing whether its holding extends to the specific jurisdiction of federal courts to hear claims by plaintiffs from different states. But according to Loyola Law School professor Adam Zimmerman, we should expect defendants in nationwide or multistate class actions in federal court to cite the Bristol-Myers Squibb decision to try to squelch claims by out-of-state plaintiffs..."I wouldn't say the opinion is definitive but you can't help but think that's where we're going," said Zimmerman, who signed an amicus brief by civil procedures professors backing the plaintiffs suing Bristol-Myers.


KCRW-FM – 06.19.17

SCOTUS HEARS POTENTIALLY LANDMARK CASE ON ELECTION GERRYMANDERING

Professor Jessica Levinson of Loyola Law School, Los Angeles discusses the Supreme Court decision to review a case on gerrymandering and whether the Republican Party has unconstitutionally drawn districts to prevent Democrats from winning in Wisconsin.


PrawfsBlawg – 06.19.17

SCOTUS OT16 SYMPOSIUM: JURISDICTION AND POWER IN BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB 

I read the Court's opinion in Bristol-Myers Squibb somewhat differently than Howard does. This doesn't strike me as a purposeful availment case; neither "purposive" nor "avail" (nor derivatives thereof) even show up until Justice Sotomayor's dissent. The majority accepts that BMS has various contacts with California, but denies that those contacts are related to the claims at issue, or that there's "any adequate link between the State and the nonresidents' claims." That looks like an argument devoted to the second prong of the specific jurisdiction test, not the first. (Though he's critical of the Court's holding, Adam Zimmerman apparently agrees on this point.)


KPBS-TV – 06.19.17

RECALL PROVISION IN CALIFORNIA BUDGET SEEKS TO SAVE DEMS’ SUPERMAJORITY

 “The recall provision is perfectly crafted in order to try and help state Sen. Newman keep his seat,” said Loyola Law School professor and political ethics expert Jessica Levinson.


Albany Times Union – 06.19.17

'PUBLICITY' BILL THREAT TO FREE SPEECH

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jennifer Rothman argues against a New York bill on right of publicity in a jointly authored op-ed.

New York is a leading international center of arts and entertainment. But the Empire State could lose out if the Legislature succeeds in rushing through a dramatic legal change that would allow celebrities to sue to block commentary about them that they don't like.


Huffington Post – 06.19.17

SUPREME COURT AGREES TO HEAR POTENTIALLY MONUMENTAL POLITICAL GERRYMANDERING CASE

 “The court has had problems in figuring out how to deal with this, depending on how you count it, 13 years or 30 years or 60 years or forever,” said Justin Levitt, a professor at Loyola Law School who served as a deputy assistant attorney general in the Justice Department’s civil rights division during the Obama administration. “The court has never had a clear approach to partisan gerrymandering once it decided to start hearing these cases at all.”


Associated Press – 06.19.17

COSBY ALTERNATE JUROR ‘PROBABLY’ WOULD HAVE CONVICTED

 “We get 12 people to agree on sex assault cases all the time, but this is not any case. It’s an old case, it’s a controversial case, it’s a case that involves questions of consent,” said Loyola Law School professor Laurie Levenson.


National Law Journal – 06.19.17

LAW PROFS OFFER THEORIES FOR COSBY OUTCOME

 “We get 12 people to agree on sex assault cases all the time, but this is not any case. It’s an old case, it’s a controversial case, it’s a case that involves questions of consent.” —Laurie Levenson, professor at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, told the Associated Press.


Associated Press – 06.19.17

COSBY TEAM TRIUMPHANT, BUT SEX CRIME RETRIAL, LAWSUITS LOOM

 “Anything can happen because it’s a new set of jurors,” (Laurie) Levenson said. “The second time around, are they coming with an agenda? Do they want to save Cosby, or do what the first jury couldn’t do, which was convict him?”


The Culture Trip – 06.19.17

A TOUR OF LOS ANGELES' POSTMODERN ARCHITECTURAL LANDMARKS

The Loyola Law School was designed by Frank Gehry in the late 1970s, then built over the next several years. Gehry was hired for the project before he was a big name in architecture due to the suggestion of Professor Robert Benson. According to the LA Conservancy, “Gehry created an award-winning group of unique yet complementary buildings in a compact, plaza-centered plan, drawing on classical settings like the Roman Forum to visually evoke the history and weight of the legal profession.” The campus consists of multiple buildings and a parking garage, the most visually arresting being the Fritz B. Burns Academic Center. It is the campus’ largest structure and is a vibrant yellow in color. Watch a guided tour of the campus in the video below.


KCAL – 06.18.17

THE TRUMP PRESIDENCY: RUSSIA INVESTIGATION & OBSTRUCTION OF JUSTICE PROBE

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson discussed the ongoing Russia investigation.


KNX 1070-AM – 06.18.17

MICHELLE CARTER CONVICTED IN SUICIDE CASE

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Laurie Levenson provides commentary on Michelle Carter’s groundbreaking guilty verdict.


BuzzFeed News – 06.17.17

AFTER A JUDGE DECLARED A MISTRIAL IN THE BILL COSBY RAPE CASE, NOW WHAT?

Laurie Levenson, professor of law at Loyola Law School, agreed that knowing the jury split would be an important factor.

"If more jurors were inclined to acquit, then a retrial may not be the best decision," she said. "However, if there were just a couple of holdouts, the prosecutor can try for a better result the second time."


Washington Post – 06.16.17

MICHELLE CARTER, WHO URGED HER BOYFRIEND TO COMMIT SUICIDE, FOUND GUILTY IN HIS DEATH

Legal experts say the decision could have national implications as courts grapple with how to apply long-standing laws as technological changes have taken interactions online. In Carter’s case, the ruling suggests that in effect, she was whispering in Roy’s ear, “kill yourself, kill yourself,” said Laurie Levenson, a criminal law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. And it essentially says that those words can lead someone to suicide.


The New York Times – 06.16.17

TEENAGER WHO URGED FRIEND TO KILL HIMSELF IS GUILTY OF MANSLAUGHTER

 “We don’t see this every day,” said Laurie Levenson, a law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. She said that the decision by a single court in Massachusetts was unlikely to set a legal precedent, but that it could have a social effect. “On the broader societal spectrum, I think it sends a message that behavior that we sometimes attribute to odd teenage behavior can actually be so extreme that it’s homicide,” she said.


Los Angeles Times – 06.16.17

MICHELLE CARTER FOUND GUILTY IN MASSACHUSETTS TEXTING SUICIDE CASE

“It may not set a legal precedent, because I don’t think it does at this level of court, but its notoriety will have an impact. I think it will embolden more prosecutors to bring cases like this,’’ said Laurie Levenson of Loyola Law School.


Capital Public Radio – 06.16.17

RECALL PROVISION IN CALIFORNIA BUDGET SEEKS TO SAVE DEMS' SUPERMAJORITY

 “The recall provision is perfectly crafted in order to try and help state Sen. Newman keep his seat,” says Loyola Law School professor and political ethics expert Jessica Levinson.


Newburgh Gazette – 06.16.17

DEFEATED TRUMP HINTS AT SUPREME COURT TRAVEL BAN APPEAL

Jessica Levinson, a law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, said Monday's ruling was yet another signal that Trump's executive order was on weak legal footing.


Los Angeles Wave – 06.15.17

D.A. CLEARS LAPD OFFICER IN SHOOTING OF BLACK WOMAN

Laurie Levenson, a law professor at Loyola Law School and UCLA Law School, says the history of cases in Los Angeles — from Rodney King to Rampart — has shown how hard it is to convict police officers. “They are allowed by law to use force, even deadly force,” Levenson said. “It is hard for jurors to believe that a person sworn to protect them would intentionally use deadly force for an improper purpose. [Jurors] always seem willing to give police the benefit of the doubt.”


The Orange County Register – 06.15.17

CALIF. DEMOCRATS CHANGE RECALL ELECTION RULES TO HELP SEN. JOSH NEWMAN

 “If this was truly about trying to get at the systemic problem of false signature gathering, I don’t think the bill would look this way,” said Jessica Levinson, a Loyola Law School professor. “It would be broader — it would apply to all the different ways we gather signatures.


Park La Brea News Beverly Hills Press – 06.15.17

BHBA HONORS CALIFORNIA SUPREME COURT JUSTICES

Scholarships were presented to seven economically disadvantaged, academically qualified local law students who have demonstrated a commitment to public interest efforts, including Nneka Jackson ’18, of Loyola Law School; Vivian Cheung, of Pepperdine University School of Law; Monica Ponce De Leon and Betzayda Montoya, of Southwestern Law School; Norma Ventura and Viviana Arcia, of UCLA School of Law; and Roza Petrosyan, of USC Gould School of Law.


France24 – 06.13.17

TRUMP TRAVEL BAN SUFFERS FRESH LEGAL DEFEAT

Jessica Levinson, a law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, said Monday's ruling was yet another signal that Trump's executive order was on weak legal footing..."The longer it goes on, in a way the worse it is for the Trump administration because they claimed they needed this right away for national security," she said. "It's harder to argue that time is of the essence when so much time goes by."


Bloomberg BNA – 06.12.17

NO LIVES LEFT FOR XBOX PLAYERS AS SCOTUS BLASTS STRATEGY

The majority didn’t reach the question of whether lead plaintiffs have standing to continue pursuing a class action after their individual claims go away. This is the “big story,” Adam Zimmerman, professor of complex litigation at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, told Bloomberg BNA in an email.


KQED-FM – 06.12.17

TRUMP TRAVEL BAN LOSES ANOTHER ROUND IN COURT 

Loyola Law School Professor Jessica Levinson said the 9th Circuit agreed with the Trump administration that the president has extraordinary authority over issues of immigration and national security. But, she said, the court still won’t let the ban take effect because the judges didn’t feel the Trump administration had made a good case for singling out those six countries, entirely halting the refugee program or severely limiting the number of refugee entries this year.


The Washington Times – 06.11.17

AMERICANS SORTING THEMSELVES ALONG PARTY LINES, SAYS STUDY

Justin Levitt, law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles who studies redistricting, said that although the battles over the maps can be “vicious” they are not the main contributor to political polarization. “I think it has contributed to polarization, but it’s a relatively small factor,” he said.


San Francisco Chronicle – 06.10.17

ARE GOVERNORS IGNORING LAW WHEN APPOINTING UC REGENTS

Whether the governor is breaking the law would be up to a judge, said Jessica Levinson, a law professor and government ethics expert at Loyola Law School. “But it’s pretty clear that it doesn’t meet our expectation,” she said. “Our general expectation of ‘consult’ is that it’s distinct from ‘informing.’ You wouldn’t say, ‘I’m consulting this person by leaving a note on their door.’”


KQED-FM – 06.10.17

$100,000 TO SNITCH? PERKS FOR JAILHOUSE INFORMANTS COME UNDER SCRUTINY

But criminal informants are "inherently unreliable by definition," according to Loyola Law School Professor Alexandra Natapoff. "They're giving the government information in exchange for a benefit," she says.


Los Angeles Times – 06.09.17

A CALIFORNIA LAWMAKER WANTS TO MAKE IT EASIER FOR TAXIS TO COMPETE WITH UBER. BUT IS IT TOO LITTLE, TOO LATE?

Uber and Lyft’s business models rely on using public pressure and lobbying to shape and change laws and regulations, said Elizabeth Pollman, a professor at Loyola Law School who has written about how Uber and Lyft have challenged existing state and local rules. “Their business model wasn’t just to replicate the world we had, but rather to create a new model,” Pollman said.


Patch.com – 06.09.17

EXONERATED AFTER DECADES IN PRISON, FRANKY CARRILLO SEEKS TO BE EAGLE ROCK'S ASSEMBLYMAN  

Franky Carrillo is also on the boards of the Center for Juvenile Law and Policy at Loyola Law School, the Santa Clara University Innocence Project, the Anti- Recidivism Coalition and the Jesuit Restorative Justice Initiative, according to his campaign. 


 

NHPR – 06.08.16 

6.08.16: DECLARING WAR, SNITCHING, & THE MEMORY PALACE

Professor Alexandra Natapoff of Loyola Law School, Los Angeles is featured on NHPR’s Word of Mouth.


Wisconsin Public Radio - 06.08.17

WISCONSIN'S REDISTRICTING CASE COULD SOON BE HEADED FOR SCOTUS 

"It's extremely likely that the court will take this case," said Justin Leavitt, an election law professor at Loyola Law School and a redistricting expert. "I think the vast majority of court-watchers and the vast majority of people who do work on redistricting believe that the court will hear this."


Fox 11/KTTV-TV – 06.08.17

COMEY’S TESTIMONY 

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson provides commentary following James Comey’s hearing.


KPCC-FM – 06.08.17

AIRTALK SPECIAL COVERAGE: JAMES COMEY HEARING BEFORE THE SENATE INTELLIGENCE COMMITTEE 

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Justin Levitt joins AirTalk to analyze the impact of former FBI Director James Comey’s testimony before the Senate on his interactions with President Trump with regard to Russian interference.


Fox 11/KTRTV-TV – 06.08.17

JAMES COMEY TESTIFIED BEFORE SENATE 

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Jessica Levinson provides commentary following James Comey’s hearing.


San Jose Mercury News  - 06.08.17

MORE THAN 4,000 ‘INCIDENTS’ MARRED CALIFORNIA’S NOVEMBER ELECTION, ACCORDING TO A WATCHDOG GROUP 

Voter fraud has not been shown to exist on a widespread scale. A study by a Loyola Law School professor published in The Washington Post in 2014 found 31 instances of voter fraud out of more than 1 billion ballots cast between 2000 and 2014.


Bridge – 06.08.17

DETROIT COURT GETS TOUGH ON TRAFFIC TICKETS. COUNTY TAXPAYERS GET STUCK WITH TAB 

Alexandra Natapoff, a criminal law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, is writing a book about how courts handle low-level offenses. She said fines have gotten out of hand. “Just because you can afford to pay a $500 fine doesn’t mean you should have to,” she said. “We should be having a public conversation about ways to raise revenue, but this is happening under the radar and without that conversation.”


Associated Press – 06.07.17

CALIFORNIA BUSINESSES JOIN, PAY FOR GOV. BROWN'S CHINA TRIP 

"Any elected official hears more about the hopes and dreams and concerns of those who can pay to fund trips and spend time with him," said Jessica Levinson, a professor who studies government and ethics at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.


San Francisco Chronicle – 06.07.17

GHOST SHIP CONVICTIONS MIGHT BE A TALL ORDER 

“I think those were the charges that fit the best,” said Laurie Levenson, a criminal law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. “Involuntary manslaughter is all about careless, reckless behavior with no intent to harm.”


LLM Guide – 06.07.17

HOW AN LL.M. IN MEDIA AND ENTERTAINMENT LAW CAN IMPROVE YOUR CHANCES OF BREAKING INTO THE INDUSTRY 

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles’ LLM director Aaron Ghirardelli says that for foreign lawyers wanting to break into the media and entertainment business, an LL.M. from a US school is essential “because the majority of the movies and TV shows are made, of course, in the US”.


The Arizona Republic – 06.07.17

FEARING PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP'S HARD-LINE POLICIES, IMMIGRANT ACTIVISTS DROP SUPPORT OF PHOENIX ID CARD 

Emily Robinson, co-director of the Loyola Immigrant Justice Clinic in Los Angeles, said the city can help shield undocumented immigrants who get cards by adding benefits that attract other residents to sign up... “To some extent, I understand the concern," Robinson said of cardholder data. “But at the same time, people do have to function in society. Without an ID, your whole life is limited. We take for granted the number of times we’re asked for our ID."


California Health Online – 06.07.17

A ‘SAFE’ SPACE TO SHOOT UP: WORTH A TRY IN CALIFORNIA? 

Even if the state measure were to pass, it might face significant resistance from the federal government, since the drugs that would be injected are illegal under U.S. law, said Stanley Goldman, a criminal law professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. “So you’d have to be fairly assured that the federal government was not going to proceed against such operations before people could feel completely comfortable with participating,” Goldman said.


KPCC-FM – 06.06.17

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN FORMER FBI HEAD JAMES COMEY TESTIFIES ON THURSDAY by AirTalk

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Professor Justin Levitt looks ahead to the testimony of former FBI director James Comey.


New York Times – 06.06.17

SHE’S ACCUSED OF TEXTING HIM TO SUICIDE. IS THAT ENOUGH TO CONVICT

“The key issue is going to be causation, of who actually caused the death,” said Laurie Levenson, a professor of law at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, who said suicide was generally considered the victim’s decision. “Did she,” Ms. Levenson said, “or did the victim himself?”


Book Riot – 06.06.17

HAPPY NATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION DAY, FROM A LIBRARIAN by Tiffani Willis

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Reference Librarian Tiffani Willis writes about higher education helped her achieve her goals.

In the sixth grade I decided to not only go to college, but to go away to college. Books played a significant role in my decision. It was simple really. I loved reading and wanted to read more. I wanted to travel to the places I read about. And, I wanted to talk to people about what I read. An institution of higher education seemed to be the best way to do that.


DMN Newswire – 06.06.17

NEW BOOK SHOWS HOW TO DIVORCE CONSCIOUSLY AND AVOID THE PRISONERS’ DILEMMA IN YOUR DIVORCE 

In The Collaborative Divorce Advantage, co-author Kevin Chroman, Esq., shares how Collaborative Divorce provides couples with a faster, smarter, kinder, and cheaper divorce. By describing litigated divorce as a prisoners dilemma, he deftly illustrates how Collaborative Law provides a healthier alternative that meets divorcing couples needs and goals better.


Los Angeles Times – 06.06.17 

HARRY ZAVOS, GLENDALE POLITICAL ACTIVIST AND LOYOLA LAW PROFESSOR EMERITUS, DIES AT 84

Harry Zavos, professor emeritus at Loyola Law School and co-founder of the Glendale Coalition for Better Government, died on May 25. He was 84.


Mirror UK – 06.05.17

BILL COSBY ARRIVES AT COURT FLANKED BY ON-SCREEN DAUGHTER TO FACE SEX TRIAL OVER CLAIMS HE DRUGGED AND ATTACKED COLLEGE COACH

Loyola Law School professor Laurie Levenson said: "We've had an OJ hangover for many years. "What you worry about as the judge is that the lawyers don't showboat, the evidence gets presented fairly, and that you have a jury that does its job and is not being thrown into the whole milieu of the trial outside the courtroom."


The Washington Post – 06.01.17

A DRIVER’S LICENSE IN D.C. WILL SOON COME WITH A PERK: AUTOMATIC VOTER REGISTRATION 

“These kind of opt-out or automatic voter registration systems are just good 21st century government,” said Justin Levitt, who worked as a deputy assistant attorney general in the ­Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department under former president Barack Obama. “I would expect more of them as more states realize that the inefficient means of voter registration are actually pretty expensive.”


Associated Press – 06.05.17

BILL COSBY GOES ON TRIAL IN SEXUAL ASSAULT CASE THAT WILL DEFINE HIS LEGACY

"We've had an O.J. hangover for many years," said Loyola Law School professor Laurie Levenson. "What you worry about as the judge is that the lawyers don't showboat, the evidence gets presented fairly, and that you have a jury that does its job and is not being thrown into the whole milieu of the trial outside the courtroom."


 

KCRW-FM – 06.02.17

WILL CALIFORNIA END DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME?

Pressplay friend and election ship Jessica Levinson has written a whole opinion based Extolling the virtues of daylight saving time, check it out in the Sacramento Bee. She said, in a word, a “disaster.” In two words, “an unmitigated disaster.”


Bloomberg BNA – 06.01.17

ARBITRATION UPDATE: CFPB RULE UNCERTAIN, MIXED FATES FOR OTHERS 

The Department of Education cleared the CRA 60-legislative-day hurdle in mid-May, professor Adam Zimmerman told Bloomberg BNA in an email...“Interestingly, there wasn’t enough of a political appetite to reverse the DoE rule under the CRA, in part, because repeal under the CRA would have also eliminated other desirable parts of the DoE rule, like a provision that permitted the DoE to claw back funds from failed for-profit colleges and collectively respond to claims for student debt relief (particularly by veterans),” Zimmerman said.


JDJournal – 06.02.17

CALIFORNIA BAR EXAM RESULTS SHOW WIDE RANGE OF RESULTS 

UCLA and Loyola law schools took demand of the results, posting a 65 percent passage rate in the category of law schools with at least 11 students taking the exam. Results from schools that have less than 11 students taking the exam are not released in order to protect the identity of those students.